woodland orchid?

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Jeremy
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-10-01
woodland orchid?

These photos were sent to me by a friend who took them in northern NJ. The plant is 18"tall+- at the edge of a clearing, mesic woods, flowers 1/2", very aromatic. He's visited the plant several times and it seems to be the only one of its kind in the area. The recent intense heat might have done-in the later buds. Flowers open from bottom to top of stalk, and the upper ones are shriveling without opening. Flowers are visited by many small insects.

Jeremy
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-10-01

For some reason the second photo didn't attach to the first message. Here it is.

Jeremy Uxbridge, MA US Zone 6a Consider that you might be wrong.

BalistrieriCarlo
BalistrieriCarlo's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-11-04

What you're looking at is Epipactus helleborine. It's the only orchid I know of that can be described as a weedy invader--yet I'll have it anytime! It comes in a small but interesting range of colors--from very light green to a deep rosy green. It can grow nearly anywhere, and under an amazing range of conditions. I've even seen it blooming from between the cracks in concrete.

Originally from Europe, it is making its way across North America and I've seen it at least as far west as Wisconsin. Where there is one, there will be more. 

Enjoy it.

Carlo A. Balistrieri

Carlo Balistrieri Photography

Lake City, SC

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Strange you say Epipactis helleborine is a weed! Here in Norway it is native but not very common and never a weed. I am always happy when I encounter some in the woods.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Jeremy
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-10-01

Send us your poor, your hungry, your Epipactis yearning to be weeds!I thank you, my friend thanks you...

Jeremy Uxbridge, MA US Zone 6a Consider that you might be wrong.

Kelaidis
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

I remember seeing Epipactis helleborine forty years ago naturalized in Vermont and New York. It has appeared in Colorado recently, growing in lawns in Boulder. It is not what I would call a problem, and very pretty.

I don't think it's going to be crowding many dandelions and crabgrasses out of existence!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Epipactis was also discovered in St. John's a few years back..also growing on a lawn.  As it happens, that lawn was from a friend of mine...I have to remember to ask for some before he leaves his property in the next 2-3 years (the whimp is moving to Ontario because he finds our winters too challenging...I wish him luck growing Meconopsis there!LOL!)

Todd Boland St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada Zone 5b 1800 mm precipitation per year

Cockcroft
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-27

Epipactis helleborine showed up voluntarily last year in my garden in Bellevue, Washington.  This year there are 2 more plants, spaced about 10 feet apart.  Friends in Hillsboro, Oregon have it all over their garden, and several others here in Washington have it, too.  So it's made its way across the U.S. and seems quite happy in the Pacific Northwest.

Claire Cockcroft Bellevue, Washington Zone 7-8

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Cockcroft wrote:

Epipactis helleborine showed up voluntarily last year in my garden in Bellevue, Washington.  This year there are 2 more plants, spaced about 10 feet apart.  Friends in Hillsboro, Oregon have it all over their garden, and several others here in Washington have it, too.  So it's made its way across the U.S. and seems quite happy in the Pacific Northwest.

Hello Cockcroft, welcome to the NARGS Forum.  Well, I don't have much to add in the way of Epipactis helleborine, but I wanted to share the fact I also lived in Bellevue, WA for 4 years (1982-86)... although on forums I might refer to my having lived in the "Seattle area", to keep the landmarks generic.  There were some fabulous rock gardeners in the area at the time, including Roy Davidson who lived about a mile from me, also in Bellevue.  I have fond memories of my Bellevue days, particularly of the easy access to Mt. Rainier, the dry eastern side of WA, the Wenatchee Mts, Columbia River Gorge, Yakima,... I do miss the area.  Looking forward to your postings.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Aaaah, Mark! How time heals all wounds...

You mention all those wonderful people in Seattle (I would have added Steve Doonan, Pat Bender, Bob Putnam, the Capercis, Ms. Kruckeberg, Herb Dickson and a good many more to the list...), and the mountains and more...

But have we forgotten the gastropods so thoroughly? I will never forget your description of how they would emerge, positively elephantlike, out of the ravine...

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Middleton
Middleton's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-10-01

Thank you gents, I've wondered what this plants name was!  One plant a year has popped up in my perennial bed for 15 years here in central Ontario.Last Wednesday, I noticed it for the first time at our cottage in Muskoka...one plant!  ‘Freaky’  that I returned home to research it and found you discussing it. Thanks for posting the photo Jeremy.Sharon

Sharon Zone 5 Georgian Bay, Central Ontario, Canada

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