tiny phloxes

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penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24
tiny phloxes

Pictures of some very tiny phloxes, grown from Alplains seed. The first two were planted last year; the third, this year. 

I stupidly planted all three seedlings of Phlox griseola directly from the seed pot into the garden, thinking that at least two, if not three, would die, and now I can't transplant them.

 

Bob

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Little cuties... What species are the first and third photos?

P. griseola looks terrific, from the photo on the back cover of the 2012 Alplains catalogue (yes, this just happened to be laying on the table... ).   The description of P. opalensis sounds great too:  "compact buns of square stems are covered with white wool and bear large white flowers".  I was already hooked at the "white wool" part.

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

I thought the names would display, when you move the cursor over the pictures, but, anyway, first is P. austromontana subsp. jonesii, and third is P. opalensis. 

Had a large patch of P. hoodii here, ages ago, but it died out for some reason. Rabbits like the microphloxes. They seem to think it's funny to tear them apart. (It isn't.) A couple of years ago I decided to replace the microphloxes, and this is the result. 

Once the phloxes in the ground, and have gone through a winter, transplanting usually kills them. Ask me how I know....

 

 

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

[quote=Nold]

I thought the names would display, when you move the cursor over the pictures, but, anyway, first is P. austromontana subsp. jonesii, and third is P. opalensis. 

[/quote]

Yes, one would think.  It doesn't work for me, in any case.  

Oh, so there is P. opalensis in the flesh, so to speak!  Cool!  Hope to see it as it matures.

Ah, I guess those roots drive down deep and fast...

 

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Taproots, mostly. Phlox longifolia moves around (a lot), and that can be dug up and transplanted. 

The little Phlox opalensis is growing in my new sand pile. The sand pile was originally intended to be nothing but sand and gravel, but the sand reeked of diesel fuel, and I wasn't able to find any information on diesel-fuel tolerant plants, so, against all my principles, I added a couple of bags of organic matter and some Yum Yum Mix, in hopes that if the sand was drenched in diesel fuel, the microbes in the Yum Yum would take care of that, and the smell was gone by this spring. Fortunately most of the organic gunk is gone, too. 

(I'm too superstitious to say what else is growing in the sand pile. Oh, Phlox woodhousii. Among other things.)

 

Bob

 

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

What, the perfect environment to grow oil shale plants (e.g. Penstemon debilis), squandered?  ;-)

Don't worry about bringing down the wrath of the gods... no one visits this site, so your secret should be safe.  

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Oh, I don't know. Every time I say I've finally gotten ********* *********** to grow, it doesn't appear the next year. 

Penstemon debilis doesn't need oil shale (really just shale with paraffin in it), but it detests organic matter like peat moss. (I blame everything on organic matter in the soil.)

Attached, poor photo of sand pile, looking across from the other raised bed, which is just dirt and gravel. Lots of cages to protect young plants from rabbits. Mostly cactus and oncocyclus iris, with some other things, including Phloxes opalensis and woodhousii, and Abronia nana.

 

Bob

 

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Wow!  Would love to be able to pore over it, especially when those irises were in bloom!

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

The sand pile was originally for Abronia nana and some other plants, but I moved a bunch of oncos there, since I thought having two raised beds with oncos would enhance the snob appeal, and they've mostly flourished. Iris paradoxa has been practically evergreen here, and seemed to relish the worst summer I've ever seen here (constant thunderstorms and no sun). (They'll probably all die now that I mentioned them.

 

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Gryboski
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-11-20

Nice photo of your sand pile; thanks for the inspiration.

Maryanne

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Thanks. Construction required a great deal of thought. I ordered pea gravel, and piled it there, and then I ordered sand, and piled it on top. Sort of mixed the two together. 

I added a few rocks so people wouldn't freak out. This is an adjunct to the large "main sand pile", as they might call it across the Atlantic, or "great sand pile". 

 

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

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