Pyrola?

14 posts / 0 new
Last post
vanachterberg
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-10-06
Pyrola?

I found this on a rather steep north-facing shaded slope above a brook on my Connecticut property. The two-toned waxy leaves and flowering stalk (now going to seed) look like a Pyrola picta, but since that plant is native to the western U.S., never tried by me--and this is in the wild part of the property, never gardened--could it be Pyrola rotundifolia? My plant's basal leaves are much nicer than any picture I have seen of P. rotundifolia.Barbara van Achterberg

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I'm not familiar with Pyrola rotundifolia (doesn't occur here) but, if it's helpful, this site notes that the leaves often have lighter veins, as your plant does:http://www.ct-botanical-society.org/galleries/pyrolaamer.html

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Pyrola rotundifolia is common here (in Norway), it has relatively huge flowers and the style is long and S-shaped. The form of the leaves are like your plant but I have never seen such yellow veins. The leaves of your plant are very decorative!

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Pyrola rotundifolia also occurs in Newfoundland but I've never noticed such veined leaves on ours either.

Todd Boland St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada Zone 5b 1800 mm precipitation per year

vanachterberg
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-10-06

Thanks, everyone.  Too bad I have only one plant, as the experts tell me that the leaves are so decorative. Maybe I'll be able to collect some--not all--of its seed. Barbara van Achterberg, finally retired with more time to garden!

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

I believe the commoner Pyrola in the east is P. elliptica. There is also a beautifully mottled Pyrola maculata which is common in parts of the Southeast. Your plant somehow suggests and intermediate of these to me.

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
Lis wrote:

Sorry to be so late responding to your post! I didn't look at the mystery plants until today. Anyway, your pyrola is most likely P. virens, although P. minor can look similar. P. minor is smaller and the veins on the leaves are more often white than yellow. The flowers of P. rotundifolia and P. elliptica are white with touches of pink, and much larger. All the pyrolas native to Eastern Canada seem to me to be a lot like the orchids - delightful when you find them, but not easy to make happy in cultivation. The pyrolas seem to need very specialized conditions, probably some sort of soil fungii, to be healthy. I have lots of plants of P. rotundifolia, P. elliptica, P. secunda, Monesis uniflora (I know, but it looks so much like a pyrola) and P. minor, but most years only a few of them bloom.

Interesting, Lis.Do you transplant the Pyrolas from the woods (How do you do that - I think they are parasitic of mycelia?) or have you used seed? I have tried to move plants a few times but they never survive more than a year.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lis, maybe I can get seeds from Pyrola norvegica which now is regarded as a form of P. grandiflora. But not this fall, the woods where they grow are covered by snow. Though I have to wait till next spring and look for overwintered capsules or even till next fall. 

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01
vanachterberg wrote:

I found this on a rather steep north-facing shaded slope above a brook on my Connecticut property. The two-toned waxy leaves and flowering stalk (now going to seed) look like a Pyrola picta, but since that plant is native to the western U.S., never tried by me--and this is in the wild part of the property, never gardened--could it be Pyrola rotundifolia? My plant's basal leaves are much nicer than any picture I have seen of P. rotundifolia.Barbara van Achterberg

That is a beautiful plant. I have just received a single rosette of an un-named species as a cutting from a correspondent in China and from the leaves it would be difficult to tell them apart from that plant, but of course in flower they may be very different. I am a real fan of these plants and grow P. rotundifolia which grows locally and P. chlorantha from Greece and have just received cuttings of P. forrestiana and calliantha from China. I am also trying seeds of various species received from N. America this autumn.

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

I love seeing stands of Pyrola rotundifolia in the Dolomites, often sheltering under conifers or Rhododendron ferrugineum.  A plant that really deserves closer inspection ...

Pyrola rotundifolia

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus On the moors in Lancashire, U.K. Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Paul T
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Wow, Cliff.  That is really pretty.  I'm not familiar with it at all other than this topic.

Cheers.Paul T.Canberra, Australia.Min winter temp -8 or -9°C. Max summer temp 40°C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Pages

Log in or register to post comments