Groundhugging shrubs.

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Yes, I hadn't thought about crowberry.  Probably more likely...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

RickR wrote:

Do you see a difference in growth between male and female plants?  We are supposed to have Shepherdia canadensis and S. argentea here, but I think I have only seen S. argentea.

Here S canadensis grows every few feet...lol, but S argentea is supposely only in the south of the province... Elaeagnus commutata (silverberry) does occur in isolated spots here, and more commonly in the foothills .. hoping to get some cuttings this year from a spot about 10 miles from here..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Todd wrote:

I know too well the damge from compacted snow as it melts...I used to have plenty of rhododendrons but have replaced most with deciduous azaleas as the latter are not so prone to the pancake effect.

I am rather fond of our native prostrate form of Shepherdia canadensis...it is a truly prostrate form and comes true from seed (as they don't root for beans from cuttings)

Wow Todd, a superb dwarf form of Shepherdia :o... I hesitate to join in lest you be overburdened with requests, although I'd like to join the club!  Thanks for showing that beauty and making us aware of its existence.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

cohan wrote:

Elaeagnus commutata (silverberry) does occur in isolated spots here, and more commonly in the foothills .. hoping to get some cuttings this year from a spot about 10 miles from here..

As much as I like wolf willow (E. commutata) in the wild (especially for the fragrant flowers), it's worth mentioning that it has a very strong suckering habit... something to consider when deciding where (or whether) to plant it.

Nothing too exotic here... Juniperus horizontalis 'Pancake', coming out of its rusty winter colour and remaining small and completely prostrate after 4 years:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Cute little juniper..
I can see that habit of Elaeagnus commutata in the wild, I definitely would not plant it near any garden beds (though nothing could outsucker the native poplars here, and they can reach every inch of the 6 acres with their suckers, my main reason for mowing....)..I could give it space to do its thing, likely with mowing on at least one side, such as along the side of our property along the road, already a line (not single line, a few metres deep) of trees, but I'd like denser screening......

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Skulski wrote:

Nothing too exotic here... Juniperus horizontalis 'Pancake', coming out of its rusty winter colour and remaining small and completely prostrate after 4 years:

With that name it has to stay flat for lot more than 4 years;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Here's a natural form of Juniperus communis.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

It's not exactly ground-hugging but Betula apoiensis is a nice little tree, suitable for the larger rock garden.
It's shown here just after leafing out at the end of May, and in fall colour at the end of October this year:
 

http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl/record/kew-21161
http://translate.google.ca/translate?hl=en&sl=fr&u=http://talent.paperbl...
http://www.apoi-geopark.jp/file/pdf/apodake_leaf_e.pdf

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Nice birch, seems to have similar leaf texture to the native dwarf birches (which I only see in grazed contexts, so I don't know how small they stay- I see Kristl got some seed of B glandulosa in the Rockies, and  she mentions 1-3 metres.. don't know if its the same as those I see around here) but your birch has a very different habit- more pendulous and graceful...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

I have this Salix sp. hugging the ground very well and creeping around, to be honest, somewhat thuggishly! It grows incredibly easily from cuttings also. I was told when given the original plant that it was a Californian sp. but I haven't been able to find anything like it there. I think the people who gave me it were mistaken ( although they grew many USA plants ). Can anyone help ID it please? I can take more pics if necessary. TIA  :)

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

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