Groundhugging shrubs.

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Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19

We like having these truly ground hugging Salix sp. growing throughout what are primarily the 'bulb growing' beds. The very open soil is kept on the dry side in summer through the root action and leaf cover, maintaining a good soil moisture and temperature. The bulbs flower through the branches before the leaves appear on the Salix ( in the main ).

Salix reticulata - in full seed !

                                                  

 

We were given this one as Salix nivalis ( we still think it is, but many pictures on the web look more like S. reticulata !? ). It is very easily propagated and now covers many areas. The fallen leaves are of a Prunus sp. tree which overhangs part of this bed, ( left in for scale !)

                                                           

 

Not a ground hugging species, but a lovely tiny plant is Salix x boydii. Dotted around to add different colour and texture.

                                                        

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Those are beauties, Ron!  I wonder what it takes to get Salix to bloom in captivity??  Blooming is rare to nonexistent on mine!

My Salix x boydii has been doing poorly the last two years - died back by about half after the winter of 2011-2012.  I think I discovered why.  It's planted in a two-tier wood-frame acid bed, in the upper tier.  Ants and wasps (I assume) had excavated out a cavity beneath it which I refilled this spring (the wasps had abandoned it) - it took a gallon and a half of soil to refill the cavity, so I imagine the roots of plants growing above it were pretty much suspended in the air!  No wonder it died back.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Ron, I have never really tried to grow Salix reticulata although I like it very much. It is always a pleasure to find it.

Here are two small, decorative shrubs probably useful in a garden: Salix polaris and Betula nana ssp tundarum. The latter is much more prostrate than the usual B. nana.

Salix polaris

 

Betula nana ssp tundrarum

 

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Love all those dwarf willows and birches! Still haven't got any, but I will someday!..lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I'll try to remember 1) collecting some seeds  2) posting the collection!

 

Here's another one, Cassiope tetragona, that covered huge areas on Svalbard.

 

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Fermi
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Here is one of my favourite ground-hugging shrubs, Teucrium subspinosum. Growing in a hot dry position in a raised bed in the rock garden and now covering a few bulbs such as Retic iris 'Harmony' and Narcissus viridiflorus.

cheers

fermi

Teucrium supspinosum

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Wow, love it, Fermi!  Looks prickly and wonderful!!

A couple of subshrubs in the yard here...

Linnaea borealis, which is done blooming here, though it was in full splendour through the montane forest on our hike earlier this week:

Salix retusa:

 

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Trond- Cassiope is nice- I've seen a couple sp in this clan at one spot in the mountains (not saying they are rare, just the one right spot I've visited) and thought it was a habitat I could duplicate: the north edge and moderate slope of a rocky ridge, under open conifers. Haven't tried yet though.. I tend to assume these Ericaceae will be painfully slow from seed?

Fermi-looks good- are trhe bulbs able to push through it?

Lori- is that a native willow?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Fermi, although some species of Teucrium is native here I suppose I can't grow this T subspinosum. What a pity!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori, your form of Linnaea looks very gardenworthy even when the flowers are gone!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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