Groundhugging shrubs.

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Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Lori, as you can see from the pictures, Ulmus parvifolia is a good candidate for bonsai.  Plant the one that's supposed to be a small tree and I will give you some of my antlered rats to do the job for you

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Anne, sounds like you (and most of the rest of developed North America) could use some predators!
 
Well, the way I've grown U. parvifolia 'Davidii' to date - that is, as an annual - it will certainly never outgrow its trough!  ;D

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Lori, the other night I drove up my driveway and a herd of 22 deer scattered.  They move too fast to count beyond 22.  These kinds of numbers are beyond mere challenges.  We desperately need wolves and mountain lions.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Good grief, with a deer population like that, how do you keep your beautiful yard from being eaten down to the nub?!?  :o   Is it fenced?

Here's another shrub that's suitable for the rock garden (mine is ~15cm; it's said to get to 30cm on one site I saw)... again, not exactly groundhugging - Spiraea decumbens:
 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Spirea decumbens is a new acquaintance for me, Lori! All spireas I know of are big or very big, often untidy shrubs. This certainly is something to plant. When does it flower?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Skulski wrote:

Good grief, with a deer population like that, how do you keep your beautiful yard from being eaten down to the nub?!?  :o   Is it fenced

Skulski wrote:

Good grief, with a deer population like that, how do you keep your beautiful yard from being eaten down to the nub?!?  :o   Is it fenced?

Here's another shrub that's suitable for the rock garden (mine is ~15cm; it's said to get to 30cm on one site I saw)... again, not exactly groundhugging - Spiraea decumbens:

 

No, it isn't fenced because we live on rock.  I would need to win the lottery to afford the fencing needed.  The new water garden is fenced with 8' high wire mesh.  It's located at the bottom of the property where there's soil and fencing was a possibility.  One of the prettiest sights for me is to look through the fence and see all that expanse of snow without hoof prints!  The rest of the garden is a war zone between me and the deer.  They have taught me that penstemons and daphnes (and occasionally Lewisia tweedyi) can be eaten to the nub and come back.  The shrubby penstemons literally become bonsaied and bloom like crazy - ditto the daphnes.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Spiegel wrote:

The shrubby penstemons literally become bonsaied and bloom like crazy - ditto the daphnes.

Well, I guess that's a bit of a silver lining!

Trond, S. decumbens blooms in June-July here, much the same as the bigger spiraeas in our short season.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Just came across a nice looking low-growing Lonicera (decumbent stems) while combing through the pages of Plantarium Russia (a site for the vascular plants of Russia and neighboring countries). 

Lonicera alberti
Kazakhstan, mountain-steppe zone between Terskey Alatau Mts. Ketmen, ca. 2000 m.
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/78333.html

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

That's a cool one for sure!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

One that I have been trying to introduce into my garden for years now is Ceanothus prostratus. A low mat shrub found across the northern Sierra, Siskiyou and Cascade mountain ranges.
I find it to be common on well drained slopes in open pine forest were it gets good reliable snow cover. It will root as it runs so seems to be a good candidate for increase by cuttings, sadly such it is not the case. I have tried cuttings and layering many times and failed.
Last year I dug a two or three year old seedling and moved it into a well drained raised bed that is shaded by a Scotch pine. I was speculating that it may require the mycorrhiza found in the pine litter. Last summer it just sat there and did not put on any top growth.
The last word is still out on it. This spring I see some green on the few leaves it has left, but it's to soon to see new growth yet.

http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/img_query?rel-taxon=contains&where...
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=CEPR

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

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