Groundhugging shrubs.

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Cohan, I have never tried Cassiope but I have grown both some Ericas and Calluna from seed and they are rather quick. Often they are flowering in their 2nd year.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

cohan wrote:

Lori- is that a native willow?

No, apparently, it's a European species: 

http://encyclopaedia.alpinegardensociety.net/plants/Salix/retusa

I'll have to watch for the scent of valerian in the fall - not something I've noticed.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Fermi
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Hi Cohan,

the iris and the Narcissus both spear through the Teucrium without a problem! It has meant that I haven't dug them up recently! <grin>

Trond,

it seems to be a widespread genus, but you can grow many things (like cassiopes!) which I have no hope of getting let alone keeping!

cheers

fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Fermi, it is the other way: you can grow many things which i have no hope of ever keep alive!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Good to know, Trond- my only effort in the family was with some Rhodos (I forget what it was, something small and zone 3 from Kristl), and they never really got any size to them after a couple of years, and just disappeared everntually, but that may have been entirely my fault.. oh, and Arctostaphylos rubra I sowed last winter, and it just didn't come up :(

 

Fermi-my bulb growing is still in early stages, so I'm still thinking about what to plant them with.. I have some on a berm with mid-sized meadow plants, that seems good, but need some solutions still for Crocus at the base of a rock garden.. I have an Acaena and Azorella there, but those are so tiny they really wont help.. probably need to move them and put something more robust- maybe Arctostaphylos uva-ursi would be a good sub-shrub for me to use for that--I've seen Anemones coming up through it in the wild...

Lori- not sure I'd even be able to find the native Valerian in the fall..lol- they are not very conspicuous plants at the best of times, and here grow amongst grasses, sedges, other forbs etc Still mean to get them into my garden, but hasn't happened yet...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Fermi
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Joined: 2010-03-03

This Genista lydia has molded itself to the rocks over which it grows and it a solid yellow at this time each year,

Genista lydia

cheers

fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Tingley
Title: Member
Joined: 2013-01-07

Longma wrote:

We like having these truly ground hugging Salix sp. growing throughout what are primarily the 'bulb growing' beds. The very open soil is kept on the dry side in summer through the root action and leaf cover, maintaining a good soil moisture and temperature. The bulbs flower through the branches before the leaves appear on the Salix ( in the main ).

Salix reticulata - in full seed !

                                                  

Your Salix reticulata above looks a lot like a plant I have- Salix nakamurana var yezoalpina. Not sure if this helps or just muddies the waters for identification!

 

Longma wrote:

We were given this one as Salix nivalis ( we still think it is, but many pictures on the web look more like S. reticulata !? ). It is very easily propagated and now covers many areas. The fallen leaves are of a Prunus sp. tree which overhangs part of this bed, ( left in for scale !)

                                                           

 

Not a ground hugging species, but a lovely tiny plant is Salix x boydii. Dotted around to add different colour and texture.

                                                        

[Edited to correct the "quoted" parts... Lori smiley]

 

Southwest Nova Scotia, zone 6b or thereabouts

Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19

You may well be correct Gordon. Thanks for the suggestion. Over the years friends have given us numerous of these low growing shrubs and generally we just go with the name they were carrying when given to us. We love to employ them in the garden beds to hold / protect the bulbous flowers that, when in the open, are at the mercy of the vagaries of our Fall weather. Here Crocus speciosus growing through a species of Salix from Asia. Not accurate, but that's gardening???wink

                                      

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

All nice willows! I like them with the bulbs too. something I will keep in mind when I manage to get hold of some... I've been thinking of using the much more available (for me) Arctostaphylos uva-ursi and Dryas and Linnaea for that as well...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Genista lydia is looking fantastic, Fermi.   Hmm, that sparks a memory of my long gone Genista pilosa 'Vancouver Gold'... not that it ever looked that good!  May have to try it again one day.

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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