Groundhugging shrubs.

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

John, that's a plant I would like to introduce to my garden too!

Mark, when are you off to Kazakhstan to collect seed? ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I believe a number of Lonicera collections were made during Panayoti's expedition to Kazahkstan the summer of 2010, so possibly some new ones will get introduced in the future. 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

That's a very nice honeysuckle, Mark... excellent internet-combing, as always!

Gee, Ceanothus prostratus is an unusual looking plant... what a combination of interesting features!  I can see why it's worth the efforts, John!

Here's another one that fits the bill... Prunus prostrata:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_prostrata
http://www.west-crete.com/flowers/prunus_prostrata.htm
http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/7pbhSyvghFKm8AFss7g3TA

And in fruit:
http://www.west-crete.com/dailypics/crete-2007/8-18-07.shtm

Here's what I bought a couple of years ago as Prunus aff. prostrata... hope it lives up to its name and becomes prostrate.  :o  (The way it's planted maybe isn't too good for promoting laxness... should probably move it into a crevice so it can flow downhill, if it has a mind to.)
     

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Moyles
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-12-23

Las pilitas (laspilitas.com ) lists Ceanothus prostatus as available ... good folks ... I recommend them ....

Bill Moyles
Oakland, California

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori, that Prunus prostrata in your trough is a sweet little thing.  The link you gave to the Crete site is terrific, with lots of great plant pics.  I have never really given P. prostrata a second thought, but seeing the incredibly dense prostrate plants from Crete has my head spinning, if only a super compact form like that could be had.  Thanks for opening our eyes on this one.

John, sometimes I think I should live in California (if I wasn't such a stubborn  New Englander ;)) so that I could grow such things as Ceanothus.  When I lived in the Seattle area and would frequent the University of Washington campus, even though this is not a xeric area in the slightest, many shrubby Ceanothus were grown making wide low shrubs smothered in heavenly blue flowers.  I've been tempted with trying some of the prostrate or low growing sorts, although I don't think they will do well in this climate.  I do plan on adding the lovely white-flowered Ceanothus americanus (New Jersey Tea) to the garden sometime, although a larger shrub.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

McDonough wrote:

Lori, that Prunus prostrata in your trough is a sweet little thing.  The link you gave to the Crete site is terrific, with lots of great plant pics.  I have never really given P. prostrata a second thought, but seeing the incredibly dense prostrate plants from Crete has my head spinning, if only a super compact form like that could be had.  Thanks for opening our eyes on this one.

John, sometimes I think I should live in California (if I wasn't such a stubborn  New Englander ;)) so that I could grow such things as Ceanothus.  When I lived in the Seattle area and would frequent the University of Washington campus, even though this is not a xeric area in the slightest, many shrubby Ceanothus were grown making wide low shrubs smothered in heavenly blue flowers.  I've been tempted with trying some of the prostrate or low growing sorts, although I don't think they will do well in this climate.  I do plan on adding the lovely white-flowered Ceanothus americanus (New Jersey Tea) to the garden sometime, although a larger shrub.

I thought Kristl (Gardens North) had a low eastern Ceanothus, but I don't see one now, so either its gone, or quite likely I'm thinking of some other genus...lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Skulski wrote:

Here's what I bought a couple of years ago as Prunus aff. prostrata... hope it lives up to its name and becomes prostrate.  :o  (The way it's planted maybe isn't too good for promoting laxness... should probably move it into a crevice so it can flow downhill, if it has a mind to.)

That is a splendid Prunus, Lori! Can't you put some heavy stuff on it if it isn't prostrate enough for you? ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Maybe that 3 feet of snow on top of it this year will do the trick.  ;)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Skulski wrote:

Maybe that 3 feet of snow on top of it this year will do the trick.   ;)

Probably! Likely age (i.e. repeated snows  ;D , increased length/weight will help.. I vaguely remember reading about this or some other Prunus which was supposed to become flatter over time..
On the other hand, I have a large 30 year plus juniper here which annually gets flattened by snow, and bounces back to about 4 feet..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Skulski wrote:

Maybe that 3 feet of snow on top of it this year will do the trick.   ;)

The cumulative snowfall of over 7' here this winter takes its toll on shrubs, and even low-branched trees.  When the snow compresses and turns to a rock-hard layer, it has the effect of slowly crushing woody plants.  I have a Cornus 'Celestial Pink' (C. florida x kousa hybrid) near the end of my driveway that was partially buried under 8' snow embankments. Now, with the snow-pack compressing, it is ripping off the lower branches as the ice layer lowers itself.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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