Jeffersonia

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

McDonough wrote:

Rick, do you get germination with the seed?  I'm always surprised that this plant is so expensive to purchase, when they make so much seed and seem very easy to germinate and grow on.

I do have plants from the seed you sent me, Mark.  I have not tried otherwise.  The ants seem to do a fairly good job.  I find a couple J. dubia seedlings each year way away from the plant.  The J. dubia in the first pic with all the buds seems to be sterile.  It has never set seed.  Last season I even tried hand pollinating it with pollen from a different dubia, but to no avail.   It is also the one that consistently has more than the normal six of petals.

Lots of naturally planted baby J. diphylla babies beneath mom, though:

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Interesting that you have a J. dubia that is sterile, and one that produces extra petals!  All of mine are fertile and are normal in terms of petal count.  Lots of little diphylla "jeffs" in your photo.  Do you pot any of these up for your NARGS chapter sales, or is J. diphylla considered too common thus not a big "mover" in the local plant sales.  I used to be down on this plant because flowers only last a 2-3 days, but over time I've grown very fond of it for the unique foliage, intriguing seed pods, and the untapped variability; an all around great native plant.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

In fact, the native J. diphylla is more well known among gardeners here, and since our spring sale is open to the public, we always sell out of the diphylla's.  (And I am not the only one who donates them.)  It's the dubia's that don't always sell!

Last year one of our Chapter members moved south, and donated an old J. dubia she had.  It was 2.5ft across!!!  :o :o :o

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Howey
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-05-17

Yes Mark, I too delight in the whole development process of Jeffersonia diphylla even though the flowers are so short lived as are the native Bloodroot - Sanguinaria canadensis.  J. diphylla has been in my garden for many years and has spread itself around nicely, producing copious seeds. I acquired J. dubia as a plant last year and am happy to see the tiny purple leaves emerging - quite behind J.diphylla.  Didn't think either would succumb to the frost, which we had last night and is due to go on for a few more days.  Am almost afraid to look at it later on this morning when it gets light.  Will keep my fingers crossed.  Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canad
Zone 5b

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

My sole Jeffersonia doesn't set any seed! I tried to get some new plants last year but they don't travel well even inland. Jeffersonia is never for sale in any common nurseries here. So if any of you guys get more seed than you need yourself I can gladly help you off with some ;)  Regardless which species it is ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Hoy wrote:

My sole Jeffersonia doesn't set any seed! I tried to get some new plants last year but they don't travel well even inland. Jeffersonia is never for sale in any common nurseries here. So if any of you guys get more seed than you need yourself I can gladly help you off with some ;)  Regardless which species it is ;D

At the moment I have a single plant of both species and last year they set seed. This is just germinating.

Both lots were sown the day the pods ripened which seems essential.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Rick, good to learn that J. diphylla is actually appreciated at your plant society sales; though, hard to believe that the dubia plants don't always sell out!

Francis, hope your Jeffersonias are ok after the frost, they were unfazed by the freezing cold snap here.  Good that you now have both species, as J. dubia is such a delight too.

Trond, will have to send you some seed this year. :)

Tony, having just one plant of each species, you are fortunate to get seed and good germination on both, congratulations.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

To compare seedlings of bothy species.

I have multiple flats of Jeffersonia dubia germinating thickly.  I use decomposed pine bark mulch as seed cover, the flats left out to weather all winter.  They germinate so profusely that germination tends to lift the whole bark mulch "crust" up; I try to gingerly tamp it back down and poke to break the crust up, I should probably use something else for seed cover.  When I jest that I want to replace parts of my lawn with Jeffersonia, I do so with a degree of seriousness, I want a Jeffersonian lawn :D

Two years ago after posting photos of my seed harvest and sowing of Jeffersonia diphylla on SRGC, I received some feedback that I harvested seed too early which lessens viability of the seed, eg. harvested before peak viability.  Last summer I harvested seed as I do normally, just before pods split wide open, when the "lid" on the pipe-shaped pod will easily "pop" with the slightest squeeze, or the lid seam visibly starting to separate. Because pods ripen and pop open so fast, a half day delay can be too late and all seeds spills out (when that happens, I've been known to rout around the base of mother Jeffersonia hand picking seeds found among the leaf litter ::) ).  Seed is sown immediately in flats, covered thinly with soil and then a layer of pine barch mulch, kept cool and shaded and just moist through summer, left out all winter. Flats are covered with wire cloth to keep chipmunks and squirrels from digging and eating the seed.  As with easy-germinator J. dubia, my 3 flats of J. diphylla are coming up so thickly as to raise the bark mulch "crust".  Below is a photo of both species; a bit hard to see with J. diphylla, the seedlings are smaller and come up a little bit later than J. dubia, and are an earthy camouflage beige color.

Jeffersonia dubia germination:

Jeffersonia diphylla germination:

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Last season was a let down for me and the jeffersonias.  It rained every day of the bloom season, so flowers were never picture worthy.  

This season, however, is pretty glorious!
The regular form of Jefersonia dubia:

       

And the multiple petaled plant that seems to be sterile:

       

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

OMG, your multiple-petaled form is very choice, such full rounded flowers; maybe make some divisions of that one ;) 8) 

You're having a better flowering season for them than I am.  Today I was home because my car broke down (hurrah), which as it turns out, gave me a day to look at plants in bloom on a sunny day at long last, and the Jeffersonias, which have been in closed bloom for weeks, finally partially opened their flowers today.  Jeffersonia diphylla is ready to bloom too, but with the next 3 workdays predicted to be sunny, I'll probably miss seeing them, let alone attempt a second time to cross the two species.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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