Jeffersonia

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

BTW, my best tool for dividing plants is one of those Ginsu knives that are never supposed to dull.  It's true!  I bought it at a garage sale, just to try, and after years of use, it still cuts through soil and plant rhizomes/tubers/roots like butter.  It is the cat's meow for trimming soil balls to fit into pots for the Chapter plant sale.  If I ever lost it, I would definitely go out and buy another.

Thank Rick, maybe I should get a Ginsu knife for slicing up Epimedium, they're an absolute bear to divide, the rhizomes grow so dense and tough.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

McDonough wrote:

Thank Rick, maybe I should get a Ginsu knife for slicing up Epimedium, they're an absolute bear to divide, the rhizomes grow so dense and tough.

Definitely!  Try to get with the longest and least flexible cutting blade available.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

No sign of my dubia yet.....mine is a deeper blue version than any of the ones shown.  A pic from 2 years ago.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

This was nice, Todd! Have to try hard to get hold of different colors of Jeffersonia.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I looked at my three pods of clean crosses of Jeffersonia dubia x J. diphylla.  They may have taken since they have not withered and feel solid.  However they are consistently three-quarters the size of normal pods.  I am very hopeful.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

I looked at my three pods of clean crosses of Jeffersonia dubia x J. diphylla.  They may have taken since they have not withered and feel solid.  However they are consistently three-quarters the size of normal pods.  I am very hopeful.

Are you prepaired to do embryo rescue if necessary? Maybe they have to little endosperm.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

No, I am not prepared to do ER.  I am hoping the smaller pods are just due to less efficient fertilization and fewer seeds, rather than smaller seeds.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

No, I am not prepared to do ER.  I am hoping the smaller pods are just due to less efficient fertilization and fewer seeds, rather than smaller seeds.

Rick, we're on parallel efforts here.  On my plant where I attempted Jeffersonia dubia x J. diphylla, the four pods the pods look normal sized I suppose, but then again, I did not compare their size to regular J. diphylla elsewhere in the yard.  Same with the pods on a plant I dedicated to trying J. dubia x diphylla :D

I have been doing some garden visits recently, and invariably both species are being grown, and I find the leaf and plant variability interesting me, to the point I'll ask for seed from some of the various sorts, to increase the gene pool.  The first photo is a pod on my attempted Jeffersonia dubia x J. diphylla, and the next two photos are a good looking leaf form in the garden of Peter George's fine garden in Central Massachusetts.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I see you used J. dipylla as the pod parent, Mark.  Did you also do the reciprocal cross?  I only did J. dubia x J. diphylla, but left open pollinated pods attached on the same plant.  I decided I didn't want the ants eyeing my prize pods as the only ones available for ravaging.  This way, if I miss the initial ripening, there is a good chance my special pods will be left alone long enough for me to harvest them.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

I see you used J. dipylla as the pod parent, Mark.  Did you also do the reciprocal cross?  I only did J. dubia x J. diphylla, but left open pollinated pods attached on the same plant.  I decided I didn't want the ants eyeing my prize pods as the only ones available for ravaging.  This way, if I miss the initial ripening, there is a good chance my special pods will be left alone long enough for me to harvest them.

Yup, I tried the cross both ways... anxiously awaiting seed pods to ripen.  Meanwhile I've been very busy with trying to stay ahead of ripening Epimedium seed.  I used approx. 25 different epimediums on which I hand pollinated each and every flower over a period of weeks, plus I'm sowing seed of some open-pollinated varieties I'm interested in, as they will hybridize with their eppie neighbors.  It's like shucking peas in miniature, squeezing out the little green bean-like seeds.  Have to cover the seed flats with fine wire mesh, as any flat left out becomes prime romping digging grounds for chipmunks.  After sowing my first 6 flats, intending on protecting the flats the following day... too late, chipmunks already went crazy with digging them up! I anticipate similar sowing process for the Jeffersonia, direct fresh sowing of seed into peat flats, which will remain shaded and kept mildly moist all summer and left out all winter, hopefully for spring germination.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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