Jeffersonia

203 posts / 0 new
Last post
Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

I had to look for my own Jeffersonia which grows in deep shade of a conifer, and there it was but not more than an inch or two! Nice to see what comes!
Where do you grow your plants?

My garden tends to be very dry, and where I had first planted them, they just site there and flower reliably each spring, but do not bulk up, and the self-sown seedlings would germinate but few have grown on to maturity... just too dry.  So, I started trying them all around the garden; they definitely appreciate good humus-rich soil and enough moisture to kept them actively growing... the foliage gets lush when grown under more favorable conditions.  My gardening friend who first gave me this species, gardens under the constant shade of a grove of pines and hemlocks, where they flowered and grew well, but didn't show that beet red new growth as they do when they're grown in a deciduous woodland and get lots of spring sunshine.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

When I get more plants I have to try different places! The one I have now grows under a dense hemlock but I have broadleaved trees too. The soil consist of almost pure humus. Can be dry in May and June but I very seldom use a hose to water the plants.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

So, has anyone tried crossing the two Jeffersonia species, the North American J. diphylla and the Asian J. dubia?  Both are easy growers, but long appreciated that the Japanese (and from other Asian countries) is the better of the two species, being more showy with longer lasting blue flowers.  Has anyone attempted crosses between the two species?

This year, being the earliest spring on record here in Northeastern USA, with a current heat wave accelerating the season, both species are in bloom at the same time, a rare occurrence.  So what to do... try hybridizing, what else?  Does anyone know of any success in hybridizing these two species?  I certainly dabbed pollen both ways today, given the rare occurrence of both blooming at the same time.  We'll see what transpires in a few years.

Also today, I spied some seedling plants of J. diphylla in a woodland area of my property well beyond the reaches of water hoses, and I was struck by the dark blackish coloration of the leaves on some J. diphylla seedlings; photos show this coloration.  They are yet to bloom, so I still have about 2 days of Jeffersonia hybridization opportunity available.  Hey Aaron, what sort of variation have you spotted on this plant?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Wow, I must have not so worthy diphylla genetics, or else you have really nice ones, Mark.  Or is it just all the rain you've been getting?

These are the blooms on mine from last year.  While J. dubia in the same garden is blooming now, J. diphylla is only five inches high.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Wow, I must have not so worthy diphylla genetics, or else you have really nice ones, Mark.  Or is it just all the rain you've been getting?
These are the blooms on mine from last year.  While J. dubia in the same garden is blooming now, J. diphylla is only five inches high.

Rick, your plant looks like many do... with space between the petals.  Never really thought about my plant being anything different or special, but Twinleaf is rather variable based on photos I've looked at (see photo links below).  In my plant, the petals overlap for a fuller looking flower.

Not sure where I got my plant originally, had it when I was a boy, at age 10 I started a wildflower garden, and most likely bought my plant at a local nursery.  When I moved to my current location 23 years ago, I dug up lots of plants still growing in my old gardens at my parents house, so my plant sources all the way back to my original plant.  The plant in my photograph, has been in the same spot for those 23 years :o :o... talk about longevity!  In all those years it hasn't seeded around much, just in the last few years has it started to spread.  I upload a photo taken yesterday, still looking good (even though I took off a few flowers, to use as pollen material for attempted crosses), and a photo of a young seedling.  Now that I train my eye looking for seedling plants, I'm finding them all over the place.

Around midday (noon) the pollen on both species is ripe and ready.  I dabbed pollen of dubia onto diphylla (easy to see the purplish pollen on the yellow stigma) and I tried the reverse cross as well.  I'll let you know in about 4 years whether I get hybrids ;D

Four pages of photos showing Jeffersonia diphylla, some flower variability, but the leaf shape and size vary dramatically.  And I love the seedpods, some photos here.
http://www.flickr.com/search/?w=all&q=%22Jeffersonia+diphylla%22&m=text#...

(By the way folks, using Flickr photo searches is a fast way to find photos of plants one is interested in seeing.  Mind you, there will be some misidentifications, such as a few J. dubia showing up as diphylla.  Use "Search - Everyone's Uploads" then put quotes around the plant botanical name as the search criteria.)

Cute little one, distinctively cut leaves
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sklockwood/4158868636/

Image of J. diphylla BONAP Distibution Map

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Indeed your foliage is different than mine also.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Bowden
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-04-08

Hello all,

I've been thinking about moving my Jeffersonia dubia, only because it is under a Rhododendron that is beginning to cover it too much and it isn't so visible anymore, although it still seems happy where it is.  I've also wondered about dividing it when I move it.  Is this advisable and if so, when would be the best time?

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Paul wrote:

Hello all,

I've been thinking about moving my Jeffersonia dubia, only because it is under a Rhododendron that is beginning to cover it too much and it isn't so visible anymore, although it still seems happy where it is.  I've also wondered about dividing it when I move it.  Is this advisable and if so, when would be the best time?

Hi Paul, welcome to NARGS Forum!

I received my plants from a friend who was closing her nursery; she had gobs of Jefferesonia dubia and we dug them in late summer or early fall, then I literally sliced into the very dense mats of roots to separate them, and they did just fine.  However, my guess is the best time to move any spring ephemeral is in early summer, well after the plant has flowered and had time to set seed, then divide, replant, and water well to re-establish them before fall/winter.  Jeffersonia dubia seeds around like crazy, always wondered why the plant is considered such a high-priced specialty, when it is so ready to reproduce itself.  Seedlings can be moved any time to semi-shady spots and they'll do just fine.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Indeed your foliage is different than mine also.

Rck, your largely untoothed Twinleaf plants has me thinking, I must increase my Twinleaf form representation here, to start getting a wider range of forms.  The leaves on your plant are not dentate as they are in mine, more of the classic "Twinleaf" form.  Again, this is the fascinating aspect of growing plant species, so much variation, often moreso than one imagines.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I've never had a need to divide any Jeffersonia (but maybe this year), but I do transplant mature seedlings regularly from our Arboretum garden for our Chapter sale.  Because of convenience, I transplant after they bloom and leaves are mature.  They weather the transplanting just fine.

BTW, my best tool for dividing plants is one of those Ginsu knives that are never supposed to dull.  It's true!  I bought it at a garage sale, just to try, and after years of use, it still cuts through soil and plant rhizomes/tubers/roots like butter.  It is the cat's meow for trimming soil balls to fit into pots for the Chapter plant sale.  If I ever lost it, I would definitely go out and buy another.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Pages

Log in or register to post comments