Jeffersonia

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Wow, well done, Rick!  Right there is a demonstration of the wisdom of hanging onto planted seeds that haven't germinated... a lesson I need to follow.

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Rick, those seedlings do not look anything like dicotyledons?

How are they now?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I planted most of them, but kept a few for further examination.  Not really much change yet, but I have a little better pics.  It’s the limit of my pocket camera.  Every seedling has grown a secondary root.  I cut one of the ungerminated seeds as shown in the second pic.  The seed was still surprisingly hard.     Vertical marks are millimeters.

             

 

               

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Cool pics Rick, thanks for sharing those.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Rick, seems the one you cut still was alive with a small embryo. But it doesn't look like a dicot though!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I had no doubt the seed was still alive.  I cut it because I thought I would easily see the two cotyledons.  But that's certainly not the case! 

 

I suppose only time will tell.  It was all so long ago, I won't even venture a guess of what else the might be.....

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Yow, it came back to me, and am I red in the face!  I try hard to keep the best records, but as many will attest, things still manage to fall through the cracks.

  I am almost positive that they are wild Allium triccocum seeds I collected near here that same year.  At least the mystery is solved.

I had wondered what happened to them....

Now I am wondering what happened to the real Jeffersonia dubia seeds!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Have you looked in the fridge, Rick?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Look what I found this spring!  Beneath my special multi-petaled Jefersonia dubia are two seedlings!  My other seed producing J. dubia is 25ft away. Ants carry the seeds even that far away, but always to warmer, drier areas.  This more moist area gets no direct sun, except late in the day, so I am very hopeful!  Still have never found any seed capsules on the "mother" plant yet, though.  I wonder about the seedlings' true origin with fingers crossed!

 

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Isn't this interesting.... from  http://english.knps.or.kr/flash/resources2/Model/knpsPicture_XML.xml

 

Jeffersonia dubia

RANUNCULALES Berberidaceae
Status : No data / No data

It is perennial. The unit stem does not exist and several leaves come from the root stem. The leaf is a rounded heart shape, the length and width are 9cm and the boundary is wave-shaped. The flower is red-purple. It hangs on the stem of the flower from April to May. The fruit is widely oval-shaped as a follicle. It propagates by seeds, but plant multiplication by separating the roots is done as well. It grows on the bottom half of mountains. It grows in nationwide in Gyeonggi-do, Gangwon-do, Chungbuk, jeonnam, Gyeongnam and Gyeongbuk and is also distributed in Amur and Usuri, Russia and northeastern china.

※References
Korean red data book(MOE, UNDP/GEF Korea Wetland Project, NIER)
   

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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