Fritillaria

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Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19

More F. camschatcensis, this time from Russia and Alaska.

Once established this species can quickly form ( usually by vegetative means ) strong groups.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Longma, you really have a nice collection of frits :o I am a bit jealous, I have tried but slugs devour the plants. Only one species (F meleagris) is spared. Strange.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19

Have you tried F. camschatcensis Trond? I suspect it would do well in your environment, and I've noticed that slugs will nibble on seedling leaves and those produced by the separated small scales, but more often than not ( here ) they don't eat the whole thing. The mature bulbs grow stems etc. very fast in Spring and in our experience are little troubled by slugs. It's possible perhaps that we have other things in the garden that the slugs prefer more!  :rolleyes:

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Toole
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Joined: 2010-07-02

Ron, nice Frit pics.

Frit camschatcensis grows very well down here near the bottom of the world  :) enjoying the moist conditions although it will be another 5 months before i see any colour.......

At one stage i was after any forms that were listed in the various overseas exchanges so I'm not sure what i have raised from seed as that was so long ago my memory has faded somewhat   :( although i was never successful in raising /obtaining the yellow variant.

The ones i do have here seem to vary quite a bit from clump to clump with the size of the flowers and degree of the green marking ,(if any),on the outside.

1st pic close up of a green black form ...

and then there is this one (2nd pic).....almost F. affinis like.......

Cheers Dave .

PS --I'd interested in knowing where you garden.Ta.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Longma wrote:

Have you tried F. camschatcensis Trond? I suspect it would do well in your environment, and I've noticed that slugs will nibble on seedling leaves and those produced by the separated small scales, but more often than not ( here ) they don't eat the whole thing. The mature bulbs grow stems etc. very fast in Spring and in our experience are little troubled by slugs. It's possible perhaps that we have other things in the garden that the slugs prefer more!  :rolleyes:

Ron, I had it for some years but it did eventually succumb to slugs. My problem is that the spring weather is often cool and rainy and plants grow slowly for weeks when the slugs are foraging after a long winter rest. But I have started again this year and hope for the best as the slug population is down to the lowest I have ever seen ;D It won't last long though :-\

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19

Two very lovely F. camschatcensis forms there Dave. The second one is quite extreme indeed. Looks a little like this one shown by Laurence Hill - http://www.fritillariaicones.com/icones/ic300/Fritillaria_Icones336.pdf .  It a shame the provenance is lost. Still real beauties though.  8) The degree of green in the flowers does vary quite a lot and varies from year to year I find.

If you fancy ever trying again Trond I have plenty of spare material I can let you have.

I garden on the coast of East Yorkshire, in the North East of England Dave.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Longma wrote:

If you fancy ever trying again Trond I have plenty of spare material I can let you have.

Ron, I say "Yes please and thank you"! Very kind of you. I'll PM you.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Toole
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Longma wrote:

Two very lovely F. camschatcensis forms there Dave. The second one is quite extreme indeed. Looks a little like this one shown by Laurence Hill - http://www.fritillariaicones.com/icones/ic300/Fritillaria_Icones336.pdf .
I garden on the coast of East Yorkshire, in the North East of England Dave.

Thanks for the link Ron and clarifying your address for me .
I had it figured that you lived on the West Coast of the USA somewhere.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Fritillaria camschatcensis from a friend in Japan

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I've been negligent in posting to this thread, but just wanted to say, this has been one of the most eye-opening topics on this forum; some truly astonishing Frit plant forms shown, good cultural information, it's one I will revisit time and time again.  Time availability is what keeps me from being able to post as much as I'd like, but I wanted to make sure that I chimed in to say what invaluable information I've seen here, for Frit fans of all types; thank you all.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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