Fritillaria

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Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19
Fritillaria

F. pudica

I'm very much hoping to get this lovely little plant established 'en masse' somewhere in the garden in the next few years. I'm sure they would do much better away from the confines of their pots!

deesen
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Joined: 2011-01-31

Very pretty Ron, I could get hooked!

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19

I am totally hooked already David,  :rolleyes: ;D

I am hoping that Forum members will be able to advise of their experiences growing it in their gardens, or of their observations of it in nature. It is a widespread species and so surely should show some adaptability?

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Tingley
Title: Member
Joined: 2013-01-07

I remember coming across Fritillaria pudica growing wild in the hills just north of Summerland BC. You could find it growing alongside Opuntia fragilis. You can see the climate profile of the region here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Summerland,_British_Columbia

There didn't seem to be much competition from other plants, apart from some small grasses. Tree cover in the area was sparse, mainly Ponderosa Pines, and scrubby sagebrush.

Southwest Nova Scotia, zone 6b or thereabouts

Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19

Wonderful information. Thank you so much Gordon,  8)

Although I grow many hundreds of this species, I have never had the pleasure of seeing it in habitat. :(  One day......

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Seems it could do well in my climate (we lack the high temps above 25C though) but it dislike slugs!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Ron, I find F. pudica to be very adaptable and a good grower outdoors in the garden. I've had a small colony of F. pudica outside planted under a Hibiscus syriacus shrub (very late to leaf out, so underplanting with spring bulbs works great), for about 10 years. I grew them from rice grains that took about 5 years to start flowering.  I also scratch in the seed near the parent plants to increase the colony, that is, if I can keep lily beetles at bay to prevent their gnawing right through the stems.  Nothing special about the soil except being our native rocky loamy clay generously amended with some sand.

I have seen this frit in the wild, in the Wenatchee Mountains of Eastern Washington State, at about 5000', in sunny meadows, growing in vernally wet areas where water from snow melt saturated the ground and flowed over the surface, growing with other treats like Olsynium douglasii and Allium douglasii. These areas will become dry and baked in a few weeks time after snow is gone.  When I lived in rainy Seattle Washington area, I grew F. pudica in a layer of nearly pure sand (about 6" deep) over the typical wet clay of that area, and the plants bloomed.

F. pudica in bud:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=204.msg7889#msg7889

F. pudica in early flower:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=1018.msg16228#msg16228
http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=4972.msg146998#msg146998
http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=4972.msg147164#msg147164

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Merlin
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-24

I grow a number of these plants that come from locally collected seeds. This Frit is extremely common in my area with hundreds and hundreds of them growing in favored spots. In the wild they seem to like rocky soil with some slope with sparse competitors and full sun. As has been said these areas are fairly moist in the early spring while this plant is in active growth but soon becomes extremely dry as the plant dies back for the summer. I have found that even a moderate amount of soil moisture during the summer causes the plants to loose vitality and die out. In the areas where i grow it best there is no supplemental water so it is hot and bone dry from late spring on. it is not unusual to have two flower heads on one plant when it is doing well. If you let is set seed the plant may not flower the following year, from what i have noticed.

Jim Hatchett, Eagle Idaho USA  Zone 5? 11" average annual precipitation

Longma
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Thank you so much Mark and Jim for passing on your experiences and observations.

I was considering underplanting and am pleased that you've found it to be a good way to go. I'm also thinking raised loam / sand /grit bed. I'm not sure I can get hot baking conditions consistently here, but I don't allow my pot grown plants to be 'baked' anyway and they seem to do well. I think the key for me will be to keep the bulbs as dry as possible when not in main active growth, which I'm hoping a good leaf canopy will provide. It would also seem advisable for me to do a little 'gardening' in the area so as to keep weedy competition to a minimum.

Hundreds growing together must be an amazing site. Would you say that the plants in these areas were very variable Jim? I am growing plants from a number of different states / areas and find that each area seems fairly consistent, but that there is a lot of variation between areas. Obviously this is based on a small sample and probably from very few plants. Would you both say that this holds true in nature, or not?

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Merlin, have you tried them in pots? It is hard to find bone dry spots anyplace here even in summer but in a pot I can move them inside and let the bake too.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

In my experience, F. pudica is quite forgiving of summer moisture if the soil is adequately free draining. I also have good luck growing bulbs at the base of late-to-leaf tap-rooted shrubs like Hibiscus syriacus, which surely absorbs moisture agressively when the shrubs swing into full growth and flowering in summer, helping keep moisture levels at bay for the dormant bulbs.

Since we still have nearly a meter of snow out there from our recent back-to-back snowstorms, I did some armchair botanizing on Fritillaria pudica, much variation in this species.

The flowers often fade to orange:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jlcummins_photography/8441142925/

Some flower on very short stems, notice dark color to base of flower
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jlcummins_photography/8561764253/

A colony in flower in British Columbia, these also dark basal markings.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/wcweber/4576650812/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/wcweber/4576023983/in/photostream/

Nice form, chubby bells with orange tint, dark glaucous stems:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/12150532@N04/4415581369/in/photostream/

Often they are bi-flowered:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rooftop65/3379564617/

Habitat with Olsynium douglasii:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rooftop65/3380377392/in/photostream/

Look how deep the bulb is:
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0407+0005

I notice that the soil often looks sandy:
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0105+2787

And, in a rocky habitat:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/fleegle/5850530540/

Here's what I was searching for, F. pudica and Olsynium douglasii together, not a great photo but is is as I remember the two species comingling:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rooftop65/4422843779/

In most forms the foliage is green, here's a silvery leaf form:
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0912+1353

This photo shows a light cream yellow form:
http://biology.burke.washington.edu/herbarium/imagecollection/imagelarge...

Photo gallery at Burke Museum of Natural History, Washington State,
more photos of Fritillaria pudica than you can shake a stick at:
http://biology.burke.washington.edu/herbarium/imagecollection.php?Genus=...

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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