Fritillaria

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Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19

Another very interesting Japanese Fritillaria sp. ( Fritillaria tokusimensis ) has been added to the wonderful website of Dr. Laurence Hill -

http://www.fritillariaicones.com/

A wonderful resource for all who are interested in Fritillaria.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Catching up here, Cliff, the photo of F. yuminensis instills great plant lust, what a unique beauty.

Ron, those forms of F. affinis tristulis are outstanding, as Rick called them, "super clones", with such broad shouldered blooms and that smokey "bloom" or glaucous dust on the outside with more intense color inside, wow!  Congratulations on such success with F. glauca and F. recurva, I'm totally envious.

Yes, fritillariaicones.com is a most useful site, I was tooling around it earlier this week!

I'm sad to report that F. pudica seems to be dying out, only about half of what was there last year has come up, but on a happier note, F. crassifolia ssp. kurdica sown-in-place seedlings are making small forests, maybe 2-3 years more until bloom:

Fritillaria crassifolia ssp. kurdica seedlings, the parent plant at the top of the image:

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Everyone is showing such gorgeous specimens!

Longma wrote:

the wonderful website of Dr. Laurence Hill -

http://www.fritillariaicones.com/

A wonderful resource for all who are interested in Fritillaria.

I was very impressed with this site when I stumbled upon it years ago.  And it keeps getting better and better!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19

For those with less space, F.recurva also comes in a much smaller form  ;D, reaching only 8 to 10 inches high max. These usually flower a good few weeks later than the usual taller forms, but this year they are virtually together as the taller ones are 3 weeks later than other years. No matter how much I feed and water, they stay compact, and leaf colour is more glaucous. These from seed from Shasta County, CA, at around 3,000 ft.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Ron

the tristulis are really lovely as are the recurva.

A more modest offering

Fritillaria drenovskii from Northern Greece which I think is really elegant

Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19

Nice one Tony. I find that species very difficult to capture well in a picture. You did a better job than I ever have.

Today the first F. purdyi have begun to open.

Edit 21st April 2014 to add a picture of plant with multiple flowers.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Oh my, I'm feeling fritillary angst, so many lovely frits.  F. drenovskii is perfectly elegant and a deep rich flower color that a wine drinker could love. And F. purdyi is pure waxy delight.  I should be growing more of these; note to myself: focus on Frit seed in the coming seeedexes.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Longma
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

;D

This tiny flowered Fritillaria is unfortunately under severe pressure in most ( if not all ) of it's known locations in California, I believe. I hope someone can correct me on this, and advise that it is secure in the wild.
I think it is perhaps the easiest to grow of all of these 'adobe clay' types.
F.liliacea

Added April 19th 2014 five pictures of plants from a different location to the first three shown.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Arne
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-10

Fritillaria sinica (at least the given name). Looks in some way familiar to F. monantha or F. walujewii. Anybody who can verify :)

Longma
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Arne wrote:

Fritillaria sinica (at least the given name). Looks in some way familiar to F. monantha or F. walujewii. Anybody who can verify :)

Arne, I have tried very hard to acquire material that 'fits the bill' for F.sinica ( as per the Flora of China - http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=113029 ), but I'm sure I have failed, so far. Each time the material supplied has turned out to be ( what I have keyed out to be ) F. monantha. Looking at the leaf shape, size and arrangement on your plants I would suggest that this is a more likely ID than F. sinica. Your flowers are, however, at least three weeks ahead of mine, :-\ I think the truth is these Chinese Fritillaria require more material to be examined and a lot more relationship work to be done. I'm sure someone is working on it  ;)
The only 'good reference' I've found to F. sinica is here - http://www.alpinegardensociety.net/diaries/Northumberland/+August+/370/ . This one seems to be 'right'. I'm sure this species is in cultivation with someone, but I don't know where!
F. walujewii is .... well who knows?? It is very much being debated!
The one you show is a lovely, easily grown Fritillaria and sets seed profusely ( if its anything like mine ). No need for a dry period? Humus rich soil? How do you grow yours? They are looking good  8)

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

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