Fritillaria

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Longma
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

WOW,  :o. Thanks so much for pulling all of this information together Mark. I had only found a few of these threads previously, and had not come across WTU Herbarium before. What a magnificent resource! I know where my time will be spent today.
It has been reported on numerous occasions in the past that some 'forms' of this species are notoriously difficult to cultivate. Others less so. I am wondering if some resent all but the smallest amount of summer soil moisture, and other forms maybe more tolerant. I was planning to plant up a large number of my pot grown bulbs only. I think now that, while I'll still go with the bulbs, I'll rake plenty of seed in with them. Any that grow will be those that have the 'right genes' for my conditions.
I was very pleased to see from the WTU pages that this species is abundant and of no concern there.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Very interesting also to see that sometimes the bulbs lie deep in the ground. The bulbs must seek out where the optimum conditions of moisture and temperature are. I've noticed that in my pots, they form very close to the surface.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

An unusual frit from Turkey,possibly a natural hybrid between F. crassifolia and F. armena from North of Van

Fritlillaria sp Turkey Tendurek Pass

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Seems to be worth growing!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Tony wrote:

An unusual frit from Turkey,possibly a natural hybrid between F. crassifolia and F. armena from North of Van

Fritlillaria sp Turkey Tendurek Pass

Tony, a really nice "broad shouldered" Frit, but one hard to pin down, maybe a hybrid as you suggest. Looking at the flower, I'm trying to see what hybrid parent could have contributed to those boxy shoulders; F. armena has such a tapered narrow bell shape with an end flare to the tepals; flower shape very different, although dark flower color would make sense; F. crassifolia, particularly Fritillaria crassifolia ssp. kurdica which is found in that part of turkey, does have flowers with a slightly pronounced basal shoulder to the bells. Thus wondering how this one could have such pronounced boxy bells in this plant, although the suggested crassifolia (ssp. kurdica) and armena, make the most sense given what Frit species grow in the area, as discussed below.

One research resource I use is the Turkish Plants Data Service (TÜBİVES):
http://turkherb.ibu.edu.tr/index.php

It has a bunch of ways of using the site, but the one I use most often is to help identify plants, is find the area a plant is collected in Turkey, then search the database for a list of taxa found in the particular province (Vilayets in Turkey), to narrow the possibilities. Tendurek Pass in Turkey, north of Van, is the Vilayet AĞRI.  Based on that, I did a search on both Vilayet AĞRI and Vilayet Van, to get a list of Frit species growing in the general area, here they are, this gives the list of Frit species that might be involved in the suspected cross:

742 taxa has been listed in Vilayet AĞRI
http://turkherb.ibu.edu.tr/index.php?sayfa=210&name=4

Fritillaria michailovskyi  
Fritillaria caucasica  
Fritillaria armena  
Fritillaria assyriaca ssp. assyriaca  

1091 taxa has been listed in Vilayet VAN
http://turkherb.ibu.edu.tr/index.php?sayfa=220

Fritillaria imperialis  
Fritillaria crassifolia ssp. kurdica  
Fritillaria alburyana  
Fritillaria minuta  
Fritillaria minima  
Fritillaria zagrica  
Fritillaria assyriaca ssp. assyriaca

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Mark sorry for the delayin replying ,I have been away in Crete.

My plant is clearly within the range of crassifolia which is very variable. I have two other plants collected in the quite close proximity and they are crassifolia,they are in bud at the moment and I will show them when they flower. Ron (Longma) who I correspond with has sent me a paper where the opinion is that crassifolia and armena are the same species. I sit in the lumper camp and have no time for the constant splitting based on minute variations but I do find that one hard to believe. It is very close to zagrica but that to my knowledge has not been found there.

This plant has been seen by several people in that area,Janis Ruksans (who suggested the hybrid idea in his book Buried treasures) and Arthur Nichols who has posted a picture of it in the wild on the SRGC site

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

This magnificent Fritillaria davidii won the Farrer Medal (for the 'Best Exhibit in the Show') at the North Midland Alpine Garden Society Show in Chesterfield, Derbyshire today (6th April 2013) ... exhibited by Brian and Jo Walker.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I do understand why this potfull of Fritillaria won a medal :o Impressive!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Impressive is an understatement!

No wonder they are grinning....  :o :o :o

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

One of the few frits where the foliage is as attractive, distinctive, and impressive as the flowers. I wonder how this species might do in if grown in the ground. Judging from Google Images, flower color and leaf shape are very variable.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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