Epimedium 2013

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I must learn how to make videos like that.

On a separate note, one sometimes wonders how plants get misnamed in the nursery trade. Well, it's not difficult for mistakes to happen, then that mistake gets "propagated" on a major scale, and once the mistake is widespread, it is self-perpetuating. The link below is to a perennials wholesale nursery, with a single Epimedium listed as 'Fire Dragon', however the plant shown and the accompanying description clearly show E. x versicolor 'Versicolor'. I wrote to them telling of their mistake, although if past experience prevails, no corrective action will be taken.

This is NOT 'Fire Dragon', it is E. x versicolor 'Versicolor'
http://www.cliffordsgardens.com/Epimedium/Epimedium-Fire-Dragon-p-242.html

Here is Epimedium 'Fire Dragon':
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-by21A1W80ts/Te6lZKtyJEI/AAAAAAAACYI/TPJXuapmfP...

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

copperbeech
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-03-15

Lis wrote:

But Lost Horizons in Acton sounds promising. Even if they don't have everything they list (and they warn about this in their catalogue), I'd still find much more to buy than my poor budget would allow. I could drive down one afternoon, stay over, shop in the morning, and drive home. Sounds wonderful! Maybe I'll do!

Lis, I am a huge fan of LHorizons. I am somewhat of a nursery 'connoisseur' and there is nothing like it that I have seen in Ontario (especially for perennial selection). I am 50 minutes away by car and I still go several times a season. I do recommend that you go on a weekday to get personalized attention from one of their knowledgeable employees as there are less customers M-F and it is near impossible to find plants on your own!

As well they have a wonderful display garden so overall you need to devote several hours to get the most out of your visit.

I also strongly suggest that you put together a list of plants your want or are interested in and call them in advance so they can tell you if they are available and if you want have them put them aside for you. If you have any more questions just let me know.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I want to say hello to copperbeech and welcome to the forum!

Lost Horizons looks like really nice place.  Here in the Minnesota territories, we are always "behind the times", and pretty much devoid of really good quality nurseries with such far reaching palates.  Just little snippets, here and there.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

copperbeech
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-03-15

I expropriated some lawn late last fall to create "sector" garden shown below. It isn't very large (maybe 150 square feet in total) and it receives almost no direct sunlight from June till September. In this off season I have been planning plant purchases for this space. So far spots are spoken for for these plants:

Now I am very new to this plant (Epimediums) but with a drier shade location I think I need to make use of the interesting qualities of this plant; with a very nearby large tree (basswood) and a cedar hedge there is definite competition for water and light resources.

I think I can squeeze in a (at least) couple of epimediums and I trying to decide which few among all the many varieties.

Right now I have "Amber Queen" and "Pink Champagne" on my "to get" list. Now I have seen neither of these in person so I am just going on what I see on-line. Of course I know it is personal preference but I would love to hear your recommendations given that I am only going to have 2 or 3 in the garden. So it is kind of like the topic..."If you could only have 2 epimediums which would you choose?"

(I take it that given their delicate form that they should be planted near the front of a garden to better see their spring beauty?)

Thanks for your experience.

copperbeech
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-03-15

Thanks for the welcome RR. This thread is of interest to me as I am now considering the use of epimedium for the first time this season.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Greetings copperbeech, welcome to NARGS Forum; the minute I saw the pending registration request as "copperbeach" I thought to myself this is likely to be a valid registration request (we receive hundreds of requests each day, 99% of which are automatically rejected by a anti-forum-spam plugin and lookup procedure).

To choose only a couple of epimediums, that will be tough, or at least for me it would be a great challenge to narrow down the selection. You can't do better than with the two you mention, Amber Queen and Pink Champagne, both are excellent.  May I also suggest from the Lost Horizons list of 88 Epimedium, E. stellulatum. This one slowly builds into a beautiful mound of evergreen leaves, the freshly unfolding leaves splashed fiery red-orange, changing to mottled green and red, and airy sprays of delicate little white flowers. It has season long beautiful leathery leaves that turn burnished crimson and gold in fall and winter... a year round plant.

Epimedium stellulatum in spring 2012:

Epimedium stellulatum foliage, early December 2012 on the left, January 2013 on the right, still looking vibrant:
 

I envy your plot of new garden bed ready for planting (oh, to have open ground), keep us posted later in the season on what you plant.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

copperbeech
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-03-15

McDonough wrote:

To choose only a couple of epimediums, that will be tough, or at least for me it would be a great challenge to narrow down the selection.

I do realize it is a bit of a cheesy question.

McDonough wrote:

May I also suggest from the Lost Horizons list of 88 Epimedium, E. stellulatum.... a year round plant.

I really appreciate the suggestion and the corresponding pictures.

I looked on the LHorizons site and there are two stellulatumm listed i.e. 'Long leaf form' and 'Wudang Star'. Which one am I seeing in the pictures?

McDonough wrote:

I envy your plot of new garden bed ready for planting (oh, to have open ground),

It is the last 'open ground' I can get on our small residential property so I want to do it right. And I take it from your comment that your gardens are all well established with no room for expansion? I am not looking forward to this same scenario come 2014.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

The available forms of Epimedium stellulatum represent different wild collections of the species. The original species introduction was the one collected by Roy Lancaster in the Wudang Mountains of China, and given the name E. stellulatum 'Wudang Star'.  It has leaves that are wider than normal. I have a plant of this selection on order for spring 2013 delivery. Rick has shown some good photos of it earlier in this topic; and if its hardy in Rick's Michigan climate, it should be hardy for you.
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=1254.msg21745#msg21745

The plants I showed came from Garden Vision Nursery, representing the typical species. Last year I finally purchased the one named "Long Leaf Form" (note: it's not a cultivar name, just a description in quotes). As the description suggests, this selection has longer leaves, that are narrower and more spiny-edged than the type. That said, I think they're all somewhat similar and equally desirable in the garden.

Regarding "open ground", I actually have lots of space left, but digging up new beds in my yard involves a lot of sweat equity, hard digging with a large pry bar and pick-axe to break up terrible rocky clay soil and decomposing ledge; seems that I always have way more plants that need planting than I have open beds for.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Allison
Allison's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-04-08

Thanks, Copperbeech!  I hope very much to get to Lost Horizons this spring, but in my life it is hard to plan ahead.... If I can go, I'll take your suggestions to heart.

Also, welcome. Nice to have a Canadian active here!

Gardening on a wooded rocky ridge in the Ottawa Valley, Canada. Cold winters (-30C) and hot, humid summers. Nuts about native plants, ferns, pottery, my family, and Border Collies.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

copperbeech wrote:

This thread is of interest to me as I am now considering the use of epimedium for the first time this season.

Not only the pages on this thread, but last year's, too:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=943.0

Your Ontario climate is much more amenable than mine in Minnesota.  Here, E. stellulatum is evergreen, but I often trim the previous year's old foliage, once fresh leaves are there to replace them.  The old leaves can look rather ratty sometimes.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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