Epimedium 2013

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gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Tim wrote:

'Pink Champagne' looks very attractive with those fine marbled leaves as well as excellent flowers. Mark, your story about 'Spine Tingler' is illuminating, as I have seen 'Sphinx Twinkler' in Edrom's catalogue - almost as weird a name as a lot of hemerocallis and hostas get!

As a matter of fact, I have sent an Email to Edrom, with the original catalogue from GVE, where the name, E.sp nova 'Spine Tingler' was listed.(Mark was helpful) I asked them to change this. And they did. And now Tim, look at the site, it is wrightly named.

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Tim wrote:

'Pink Champagne' looks very attractive with those fine marbled leaves as well as excellent flowers.

Tim, I am eagerly looking for Pink Champagne. As far as I know it's not available in Europe including the UK ( ;D) I searched the web, but was unsuccessful. Would  you know a mailorder nursery in the UK ?

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Afloden wrote:

Would love to trade and get free Epimedium! I doubt my collection would garner many takers in trade for the newer species selections though. I've only added one Epimedium recently from Vietnam. All the others have been in the garden for 5 years or more.

I like to add: In change of my Epimediums, I got back various rock plants. I mean to say, you may have some other treasures in you garden to trade with.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

That's a good idea Gerrit, swapping offsets from one's choice epimedium for other plants.  The problem I have, is that I hate disturbing established plants, I like to see them build up into big beautiful clumps. In fact, when I to to garden Vision Epimedium "open nursery" days (2 weedkends in May) I often buy repeat plants of some of the less expensive varieties, saving me the trouble of dividing them (and possibly setting them back). 

Three years ago I dug up one big clump of E. membranaceum, split it into three pieces, one piece did okay, while the other two nearly died, taking two years to recover and show some small promising signs of growth, although they're still much smaller than what I started with.  Lesson learned, don't divide "eppies" in mid summer, at least not with the hot summers we can get.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

McDonough wrote:

gerrit wrote:

The Epimedium thread on the SRGC is not very impressive

Gerrit, check out the Epimedium 2012 topic on SRGC, it was a busy year that year, 38 pages long:
http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=4769.0

I was a bit puzzled by that comment by Gerrit as well, Mark
There are 51 pages dedicated to Epimedium on the SRGC forum - they have been read, so far, by
58,472 people     8) 8)  Quite an impressive number reading them,  I think!
Many valuable posts by Mark McD. included amongst those pages.
;)

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Wow Maggi, that's am impressive number of reads! :o  

It's interesting going back in time and reflecting, that was the year I was unemployed, and for the first time fully experienced my garden from start to finish during the growing season. After 17 months, I found a new job in March 2011, a crazy one with ridiculous demands on my time and much lower pay; I had almost no time to garden, nor time to participate on the forums as I would've liked. Now, I have changed jobs, employed by a "cloud technology" firm, and I work from home (all work is done remotely), no more commuting 3-1/2 hrs daily, and flexible hours, so I'll once again be able to experience the garden, play with hybridizing epimedium, and post here, there, and everywhere ;)

Was sitting on my deck this morning, in a protected corner, having a hot cup of English tea.  Glorious sunshine, up a few degrees from morning low of 5 F (-15 C), at balmy 12 F (-11 C), contemplating my most recent bed of Epimedium seedling plants, in a spot where the ground tends to be blown bare of snow.  Observing the darkened winter foliage on my young epimediums, I'm full of anticipation for spring.  This photo was taken in December 2012, just a month ago, but the plants still look pretty much the same this morning.

Row of evergreen hybrid Epimedium plants, 2-yr seedlings going into third year, hope they bloom this spring.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Congrats on the new job, Mark!  This is great news for you and also for the site, as it means we can look forward to many more of your informative postings!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Thanks Lori, I do hope it will be a great Epimedium year and I'll be able to share it here. 

This year I'm ordering some epimedium from a several sources; thought I'd share what I'm ordering, with a summary of the price, to get a sense of what it costs to buy some Epimedium these days.

Order 1:
1  E. 'Flamingo Dancer'
1  E. 'Hot Lips'
1  E. acuminatum 'Night Mistress'
1  E. elachyphyllum  (had this from Garden Vision, but my plant died over winter)
1  E. mikinorii
1  E. platypetalum  (another replacement, mine died out from drought)
1  E. reticulatum
1  E. x youngianum 'Making Waves'

~$200 with packaging and shipping.
8 Epimedium plants, average cost with shipping:  $25

Order 2:
1  E. acuminatum "Yellow Flower"
2  E. 'Amber Queen'  (2 plants)
1  E. latisepalum
1  E. stellulatum 'Wudang Star'
1  E. grandiflorum 'Purple Pixie'

~$125 with packaging and shipping.
6 Epimedium plants, average cost with shipping:  $21

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark, it is even more expensive for me! I have to buy plants from abroad and to add the costs of a phytosanitary certificate :-\

Glad to hear that you have gotten a new job too!

Regarding dividing plants; I usually do that early spring or late fall. But like you Mark I don't like to disturb settled plants unless they benefit from dividing. Sometimes if a visitor wants a plant I cut off at the edge of the clump with a sharp spade or something without disturbing the whole plant. Should work for eppies too, shouldn't it?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Many congrats. on the new job Mark, hope life will be an awful lot less stressful for you.

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

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