Epimedium 2013

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gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

McDonough wrote:

Hmmm, having some trouble on that website, language links for Nederlands and Francais work but English is not a live link. Using the French link, the plant list is 2011, it is 2012 using the nederlands link, no photos, just a list.  Photos link in the francais link is broken, photo link in nederlands link works, shows an alphabet list of links, but "E" for Epimedium is a broken link.  I'm afraid, not much to see there :-(

Her website is not remarkable, but her Epimedium list is a good one. 55 items. I have to wait for her 2013 list.

Afloden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-15

Koen does offer a superb selection of Epimedium and he knows Ogisu so he gets some of the best (he sells one of the nicest of the alternate leaved Polygonatum, P. yunnanense)! Of all the places to run into someone, I ran into him in Vietnam in 2011 while in Sapa and spent a few days in the field with him and Anne! Fabulous people.

I think the number one issue with Epimedium is that they are pricey for the newer introductions. My preference is for species more than hybrids and new introductions of species selections has not increased as much as the numerous hybrids showing up.

Aaron

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Afloden wrote:

                                My preference is for species more than hybrids and new introductions of species selections has not increased as much as the numerous hybrids showing up.

Aaron

Hi Aaron, please can you tell why?

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

gerrit wrote:

Her website is not remarkable, but her Epimedium list is a good one. 55 items. I have to wait for her 2013 list.

I looked at both the 2011 & 2012 lists, there are some good items on there, and a good long list as you say.  A few are unfamiliar to me, such as the one listed as 'Jean O'Neill'; I looked it up and it's a lovely plant.
http://www.johnjearrard.co.uk/plants/epimedium/epimediumjeanoneill/speci...

And the list does contain lots of Og. (Ogisu) collections, which is special.

Aaron, funny how lives intersect sometimes, and one runs into people in the most unlikely places. And I agree, prices for Epimedium is very high, although now when shopping around, I see some mail order nurseries with plant prices at about $15-$18 a plant versus $28-$35, that helps.  There are many Epimedium species still missing from my collection, because some of the rare species will go for astronomical cost; I'd rather get three $18-$22 dollar epimedium varieties as opposed to one for $60 or $80.  Grow them (hybrids) from seed, and they cost only pennies each  ;)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Here are some more Epimedium nursery resources. Cumulatively, if one were to order from all of the nurseries listed so far, picking and choosing unique species and cultivars, the range of epimedium that can be had might amount 100 different types (of course, if they can be afforded).

Arrowhead Alpines - Michigan, USA
Good selection of 58 Epimedium this year, prices moderate (comparatively) averaging $15-$20
Lots of companion plants too (22 Polygonatum), and of course, rock garden plants.
Three epimedium show the wrong image, and have text questioning the identity; I can verify that
koreanum, davidii, and platypetalum are incorrect, other than that it's an excellent list.
http://www.arrowheadalpines.com/shop/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=65_105

Fairweather Gardens - New Jersey, USA
Another good selection of 48 Epimedium, prices moderate (comparatively) averaging $15-$20
http://www.fairweathergardens.com/genus.php?type=Perennials&genus=Epimedium

Klehm's Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery - Illinois, USA
Only 8 Epimedium, all rather high priced, but has Epimedium ssp. nova 'Spine Tingler' for $26.95
Note: the name is a bit garbled, should be listed as Epimedium sp. nova 'Spine Tingler'; as this is a new unpublished species (thus the sp. or species nova part) that Darrell Probst introduced, but he wanted to be able to offer the plant under some name, so appended a cultivar name following sp. nova.  I bet if this goes uncorrected, a new "ssp. nova" or "subspecies nova" was born. In Europe, the name got further garbled with the almost humorous transmogrification from 'Spine Tingler' to 'Sphinx Twinkler', too funny, can you believe it?
http://www.songsparrow.com/2013/plantlist.cfm?type=SHADE,&startrow=1&pag...

Broken Silo Nursery - Michigan, USA
List has 34 Epimedium, some unusual ones, almost no photos, prices run the gamut from affordable to high price.
http://bsnursery.com/catalog/section_8.html

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Afloden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-15

Gerrit,

My preferences for species are because I like the taxonomic puzzles to figure out. For most genera I really prefer species or selections of species. I think its nice to have multiple genotypes of a species to see the range of variation. About ten years ago I attempted to get all the ones Chen Yi offered, but I think I have only 2 that survived. I never tried again.

Mark, yes they have come down in price, but since I became a paying student I've not had the money like I used to!  Maybe when in China in the next year or two I'll get to see them first hand. I would be wary of AA's Polygonatum nomenclature as well.

Who is describing the new ones in cultivation now. There was a flurry of names a few years ago in China, but most seem to be renaming forms of already described species. The most recent work was a phylogeny and a revision of the Simplicifoliae.

Aaron

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Afloden wrote:

Gerrit,

My preferences for species are because I like the taxonomic puzzles to figure out. For most genera I really prefer species or selections of species. I think its nice to have multiple genotypes of a species to see the range of variation. About ten years ago I attempted to get all the ones Chen Yi offered, but I think I have only 2 that survived. I never tried again.

Aaron

Okay Aaron, thanks for the reply. Now I understand. But I wonder: do you like Epimediums anyhow? Or is it just for studies?

Afloden wrote:

Gerrit,

Mark, yes they have come down in price, but since I became a paying student I've not had the money like I used to! 

Prices in our region (the low countries) are very moderate. The commercial breeders understand the value of low prices. Koen van Poucke f.i. tells: I have to order new species from GVE for those astronomic prices. And with packing and shipping and Phyto, I must calculate, so the first years after introduction those new species are (too) expensive. 15 - 20 Euros (20 -25 $) After this period, prices will go down rapidly to a normal 7 Euros (10$) If not, nobody will buy the plants.
Nevertheless, he can't live from it. Most income are annuals and normal perrenuals.

By the way: Why not making a circle of Epimedium lovers.Everybody from the circle makes divisions from his/her motherplants and send these within the USA.
I did this several times. Made divisions in the fall or winter, cut of most of the leaves, put them in a box and sent to my friends. Epimediums for (almost) free.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

gerrit wrote:

Many magnificent cutivars at PDN! But oddly pictures.

Gerrit, I meant to respond to this earlier, the thumbnail images on Plant Delights Nursery online catalog look weird, because the "aspect ratio" is squished.  Their web page will take a full size "portrait" (taller than wide) orientated image, and squash it into a square-shaped thumbnail image, so the flowers look stretched and oddly proportioned.  Here's an example, a PDN catalog image of Epimedium 'Pink Champagne', the large portrait image, with the squashed thumbnail image version in the lower right.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Afloden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-15

I like Epimedium because they are nice plants! I do grow some hybrids and used to grow a lot of the selections from Japanese species. I think I still have XRubrum, xversicolor, and Buttered Popcorn, but most of my collection is species. There are others who are studying them currently.

Would love to trade and get free Epimedium! I doubt my collection would garner many takers in trade for the newer species selections though. I've only added one Epimedium recently from Vietnam. All the others have been in the garden for 5 years or more.

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

'Pink Champagne' looks very attractive with those fine marbled leaves as well as excellent flowers. Mark, your story about 'Spine Tingler' is illuminating, as I have seen 'Sphinx Twinkler' in Edrom's catalogue - almost as weird a name as a lot of hemerocallis and hostas get! Keeping a track on all these hybrids must be getting more and more difficult, and it would be interesting over time to get more information on which seem to be good doers in the garden. The RHS hold trials of many plants which although they can be criticised for being in one location, get round this to an extent by having a group of gardeners who have grown them in many different places. An epimedium trial would be quite exciting!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

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