Epimedium 2013

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gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

McDonough wrote:

It's interesting going back in time and reflecting, that was the year I was unemployed, and for the first time fully experienced my garden from start to finish during the growing season. After 17 months, I found a new job in March 2011, a crazy one with ridiculous demands on my time and much lower pay; I had almost time to garden, nor time to participate on the forums as I would've liked. Now, I have changed jobs, employed by a "cloud technology" firm, and I work from home (all work is done remotely), no more commuting 3-1/2 hrs daily, and flexible hours, so I'll once again be able to experience the garden, play with hybridizing epimedium, and post here, there, and everywhere ;)

Yes, I guessed wright. You've got a new job. I was wondering where you found time to spend on the forum while a couple of years ago you posted only on weekends. I'm happy for you and for those people, addicted to Epimediums.
Hopefully you come along with the mass amount of snow today in the NE. It was on the news here.
And also hope for no damages in your garden like last winter.

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Gerrit - you asked about Epimedium 'Pink Champagne'? We have just had a talk from Julian Sutton of Desirable Plants in Devon and he lists over 50 epis in his catalogue, including 'Pink Champagne'. The trouble is - how do you actually cut your order down?! I will try a few more of these this year as the ground is prepared beneath the apple trees. At the moment the snowdrops look really good; these are a selection... groups of each variety are interspersed with ferns, epimediums, trilliums and other woodlanders which come on later.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

No damage from the snow this time around, and we didn't lose power.  The temperature was very cold (about 16 F), so the snow was more powder-like, not sticking to trees and taking branches down as happens with wet heavy snow.

After evaluating a hybrid of E. sempervirens for 6-7 years, I have decided to name and introduce this one.  It has the best growth and mounding habit of any sempervirens form. In spring it presents lovely chocolate-purple heart-shaped leaflets, topped with a flurry of complimentary pale lavender white flowers.  The "leaf build" on this one is outstanding, making a domed mound of crisp leathery green hearts, each leaf with light sheen and rugose texture, neatly rimmed with red.  Even in November and December, the foliage mound is clean, green, and attractive.  It is much more drought resistant than any of the grandiflorum and youngianum types.

Epimedium sempervirens 'Passion Hearts'

foliage mound in November-December:

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Very smart plant, Mark.  This capacity to vary foliage through the season is a real plus-point for Epis.

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

McDonough wrote:

Epimedium sempervirens 'Passion Hearts'

A stunning plant indeed. Beautiful flowers in masses above the attractive foliage in spring. Red edges on the individual leaves, which is a plus too.
A plant to propagate. Do you have a nursery to introduce it?

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Tim wrote:

I will try a few more of these this year as the ground is prepared beneath the apple trees. At the moment the snowdrops look really good; these are a selection... groups of each variety are interspersed with ferns, epimediums, trilliums and other woodlanders which come on later.

An apple tree is a good protector for Epimediums. The roots going down in the depth without bothering the plants at the surface. Conifers has a superficial root system and take away all the moisture.
A deep layer of leaflitter, mixed with peat is a good soil for your new acquisitions especially your E.'Pink Champagne'

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

That is an extremely fine looking plant Mark. I wonder how many other epis are evaluated after significant trial in the garden like that? It really bears dividends.

Thanks Gerrit - I shall work more carefully on providing the best conditions for these plants. Our biggest problem is often long spells of summer drought, but I think once well established even the more moist-loving varieties can weather this quite well. Epimedium grandiflorum and its forms seem the most difficult, but also amongst the most delicate and beautiful, so I must try harder.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Tim wrote:

That is an extremely fine looking plant Mark. I wonder how many other epis are evaluated after significant trial in the garden like that? It really bears dividends.

That's an analysis that make sense Tim. That's also what I am worried about. A breeder coincidentally finds a new hybrid and there we are: a new eppi. I see so many new hybrids from Japan (x youngianums f.i.) and I think: ah another white, another pink, why should I buy.
Koen from Flandres tests his new arrivals a few years before selling. Sometimes I think: buy only species, not cultivars like Aaron does, but it won't work. I see a new hybrid and I have forgotten my concerns.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

That certainly looks like a real winner, Mark.

And with an apropos and equally savvy marketing name, too!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Allison
Allison's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-04-08

Gorgeous plant! The reddish leaves really set off the flowers, beautiful.

If only you could smuggle some into Canada.....

Gardening on a wooded rocky ridge in the Ottawa Valley, Canada. Cold winters (-30C) and hot, humid summers. Nuts about native plants, ferns, pottery, my family, and Border Collies.

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