Allium 2013

83 posts / 0 new
Last post
Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I've grown this species for almost 40 years, but never have seen an autumn sprouting. Do you have a photo of what it looked like in flower? Your "pot ghetto", very funny, I can relate to the phrase cheeky

I feel like I shouldn't complain about emoticons, they suddenly just showed up and they're fun to use, but half of them don't look much like what they're supposed to be emoting.

I have a lot to catch up with regarding Allium, I've been delinquent devil

Here's an interesting tidbit. Back in 2010 I received a form of Allium sikkimense; it has small tight clusters of blue (not nearly as nice as Lori's form), seems sensitive to heat and dryness, the flowers often abort or barely open in the midsummer heat, and it never sets seed.  Today I lifted half of the small clumps, and replanted.  Was surprised to see young sprouting offsets, but they're on "vertical" stolons, about 2" straight up from the parent bulb, essentially lifting them above the soil!  I separated the vertical stolons and planted them at normal depth, has anyone seen this before?  The behavior seems strange to me.

In the photo, the red arrow points to a young shoot on a vertical stolon over 2" above the parent bulbs, to the right is another green shoot on a vertical stolon.

 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

My supposed A. zebdanense:

         

 

          

 

         

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Pretty inflorescence!  It's not Allium zebdanense, but is a member of Section Codonoprasum, the two long dried spathe segments are a hallmark of this group (same group that Allium paniculatum is in). In a recent paper on Section Codonoprasum in Turkey, an author writes "Sect. Codonoprasum Reich. is the largest and the most complicated section in Turkey, where 44 taxa are represented".  There are many dozens more species in Europe to Asia, with particular development in Greece and other Mediterranean areas, so it might be a challenge narrowing down an ID. Recommend posting on SRGC, there are some Allium experts there (like Janis Ruksans) that might be able to narrow down the possibilities.

I'll take an off-hand stab at it, reminds me of Allium staticiforme.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Mark McD wrote:

Lots and lots of Allium coming into bloom, inspiring me to start a salvage operation on my 2-1/2 year neglected garden, ............

Hi Mark, how is the renovation going? Hope you don't mind me asking , but I was wondering if many species survived the intense competition from the weeds, grasses etc.?

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Ron, I'm glad you asked smiley

Days are getting shorter, so I have approximately 1-1/2 hrs after work to make a bit of progress, and typically just one of the two weekend days can be devoted to garden efforts, but I'm making definite progress.

Some views of the garden in the early stages of renovation, first a couple photos of the garden overrun with highly invasive field grass.

  

 

Goldenrod can come in so quick, and in just 2 years time make massive patches with dense turf-like root mass that kills everything else in its way.

 

A friend gave with Hemerocallis 'Ariel', a delightful tall and narrow small-flowered type with little yellow, bronze-flushed bugles, but also with it was a perennial sweet pea (Lathyrus).  For 5 years or more I pulled every shoot I would see, but it laughs at such feeble attempts at eradication, it MUST BE dug out.  It was like digging a tree trunk out, the incredible roots like thick ropes.  In this shot I got the daylily out, I'm surprised it is still alive, as it was being strangled by the sweet pea root mass, the vine going out 8' in all directions, a 16' diameter circle of destruction.  The photo shows just one of the radiating branches still attached to the daylily.

 

Methodically digging out and separating salvaged Allium plants, to have roots cleaned of invading weeds, and replanted.

  

 

Couple views of the excavation progress:

  
 

 

There was no obvious appearance this year (or last year) of some very small bulbous species, such as the tiny Allium parciflorum, but I was able to find about 100 minuscule bulbs, resprouting as they do in autumn, this is painstaking tedious work, but well underway.


 

More to come:

 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Thanks for the update Mark. Looks to be a sizeable project, but one which, I'm sure, will be well worth it. It would be such a shame if your collection was overwhelmed and dwindled over the years. I'll be very interested in your thoughts, upon completion, as to which did ok, or held their own, or had severely declined. I'm seeking to expand my plantings, amongst scrub and 'thuggish' grasses, in coming years and hope to include at least a few of the 'choice' Allium sp. if possible.

Mark McD wrote:

More to come:

Looking forward to it, wink

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Wow, I guess I had no idea how really extensively overrun that garden is/was!  Mark, your tenacity to get the job done is inspiring.  How I envy those that grow so many different plant and larger gardens, but this is exactly why I am reluctant to keep expanding what I have: I don't want to have to spend the time maintaining them!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Yes, there are areas that are terribly overrun with aggressive weeds, other spots that are more easily salvageable. You're wise to consider the size of one's garden, all too easy to take on too much.  But I was able to maintain this garden for over 20 years without too much problem, it really has only been the last 2-1/2 years where my work situation dictated so much of my time.  I'm inspired, by seeing what has survived, to give them a new lease on life.  One key is, to make gardens that as sustainable as possible, something I must work on developing better techniques for. 

Before I go into some of my salvage operations, here are some nice autumn flowering alliums that I've been enjoying, looking really good this year due to a long string of perfect late summer-autumn weather.  Two views of Allium sacculiferum, one that goes around as Allium aff. thunbergii DJH (Dan Hinkley) 272, a very showy small allium with dense globular heads, unlike the effuse heads on Allium thunbergii. I have this growing in a woodsy part shaded bed among Epimedium and other woodlanders.

  

 

The next two are Allium pseudojaponicum, this is one I've wondered about for 2 decades, looks similar to thunbergii in bloom, but has flat leaves +4 mm wide (not three-sided hollow leaves as in thunbergii). The newer keys separate this species on account of the flat foliage and no teeth on the stamens.  This plant came to me as Allium taquetii (syn. of thunbergii) from the US National Arboretum, it has taken these two decades for the taxonomy to catch up and additional species to be defined around the thunbergii-virgunculae alliance, to be able to apply a name to it. This one is growing in a grass-infested area, so it's scheduled to be rescued, but seems to be doing fine on its own so far.

  

 

My favorite is a robust white form of Allium thunbergii that I find to be a particularly good garden plant, growing about 14"-16" tall. It is stronger growing than some other white forms I have tried.  In one photo, you'll see Allium sacculiferum in the background, for size comparison.

     

 

The last one is a delicate form of Allium stellatum - ex, Carroll Co, Arkansas, grown from seed sent to me by Aaron Floden. Has been flowering for weeks, about a half dozen stalks, the small heads of light pink are delightful upon close inspection.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Two of the Allium sacculiferum that I grew this year form your seed, Mark, are blooming now.   I took this one to today's Chapter meeting, and ended up auctioning it off.  Anything with a flower, especially at this time of year, commands a high price!

         

(And if anyone needs to know what a dandelion seed looks like, that's what is hanging down on the left of the second pic)

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Rick, it's so satisfying seeing this, happy that you had good results from the seed, and already you shared it with others!  The heads on your young plants will get bigger and much more densely-flowered in coming years.  I should get good seed set this year, although I probably gave away half of what I had, this plant is in high demand, and as you suggest, what's not to love about a small bulbous plant flowering this time of year (and hardy). The close-up photograph is really a fine capture.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Pages

Log in or register to post comments