Allium 2013

83 posts / 0 new
Last post
Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Wow, now that's an impressive "mess load" of Allium, stunning in its utterly complete occupation of the area.  I would like to see such a sight in person one day.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Michael J Campbell
Michael J Campbell's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Allium insubricum

Michael J Campbell in Shannon, County Clare, Ireland

http://www.facebook.com/michael.j.campbell.395

Lewisias, alpines ,South African bulbs
http://picasaweb.google.co.uk/michaelJcampbell63

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Michael, beautiful flowering on A. insubricum, this and narcissiflorum are not easy to satisfy. I have about 25 seedlings of narcissiflorum from Tony Willis entering their 3rd year (from sowing the seed directly in the garden 09/2010), promising but still a long ways off from flowering size.

In full sun I grow Allium oreophilum 'Torch', a particularly rich color selection (and non-flopping too).  It is very slow to increase, have one small plant in bloom (to the left, out of view in the photo) that took 4-5 years from scratched-in-place sown seed.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

McDonough wrote:

Michael, beautiful flowering on A. insubricum, this and narcissiflorum are not easy to satisfy. I have about 25 seedlings of narcissiflorum from Tony Willis entering their 3rd year (from sowing the seed directly in the garden 09/2010), promising but still a long ways off from flowering size.

Am I glad to hear that!  I have some seedling A. narcissiflorum from last year that are still exceedingly small.  A had though there was something wrong, but perhaps not! :)

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

I was recently given this potful of A. geyeri, destined eventually for my 'Summer Dry North American Plants' bed. It looks good for this species to me, but is there any others it may be confused with? Also cultivation tips much appreciated.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

ronaldo wrote:

I was recently given this potful of A. geyeri, destined eventually for my 'Summer Dry North American Plants' bed. It looks good for this species to me, but is there any others it may be confused with? Also cultivation tips much appreciated.

The identification is accurate, this is indeed Allium geyeri.  Note however, this is a plant of moist meadows and streamsides, not doing so well if planted in too dry a location.  As I found this species in Idaho, it grew in lightly shaded locations in very moist streamside soil. It doesn't need to have its feet wet to do well, they grow quite well in an open shady spot with good moisture-retentive soil.  I have them growing in sandy soil that's been layered over heavy moist rocky-clay soil.  Up on Pike's Peak (14,114' / 4,302 m) in Colorado, grows a dwarf form once known as A. pikeanaum (but now, just a synonym of geyeri), which can grow with leaves prostrate against the ground.  I grew this form for a while; in a lowland garden it grew upright to about 6", but was not a robust grower, and while it lasted for about 10 years it eventually dwindled away.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Thank you Mark, I'll choose another area of the garden for it, one with slightly more moisture retention. Wonderful information.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Longma wrote:

 For overall  :o  :o this area of Allium ursinum took some beating though.

Thanks for posting those AMAZING photos!  What a sight!

Beautiful allium, Michael!

 

 

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Mark McD wrote:

In full sun I grow Allium oreophilum 'Torch', a particularly rich color selection (and non-flopping too).  It is very slow to increase, have one small plant in bloom (to the left, out of view in the photo) that took 4-5 years from scratched-in-place sown seed.

It's a beauty.  I wonder why it is slow to bloom and increase compared to the species (Allium oreophilum), which seems to proliferate rapidly?

Other than that good things come to those who wait, I mean... :-)

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Lori S. wrote:

Other than that good things come to those who wait, I mean... :-)

 

Are those A, narcissiflorum Lori ? I've read that the flowers are erect as you show, whereas in A. insubricum they droop down. Whatever they are, they are a great looking group of Allium. Congrats!!

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Pages

Log in or register to post comments