other cactus

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Here are a few shots of Coryphantha macromeris another hardy one.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Macromeris has not been hardy for me, but I couldn't swear how many times I've tried it. I should probably keep records.
The fat tubercules seem to be the first thing to turn to mush.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

This was the first year I had blossoms on my Maihuenia poepigii. I think I've had it for four years now.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

I had a plant of poeppigii that lived for years, until ants discovered it, and killed it within a year. I've never gotten around to replacing it, though it's one of my favorites. I'd also like to grow patagonica. Got seed, but it never germinated.
Maihuenia is interesting because of its persistent leaves.
I was going to try some pterocactus this year, since most are said to be hardy here, but I decided just to try the gymnocalyciums. Pterocactus would have to go in dishes of sand, and that might attract cats .....

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

I've never seen Maihuenia patagonica for sale. Man they can produce huge mats with stout spines look at these photos I found.

http://www.cactusinhabitat.org/index.php?p=specie&id=83&l=en

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I tried germinating Maihuenia poeppigii this past season.  The best info I could find was to try it at 70+ F.  I planted it along with my Echinocereus seeds the first week of July.  The Echino seeds sprouted nicely, but no Maihuenia.

Any hints? (Of course, seed pots are always held over for at least one more season.)

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

Any hints? (Of course, seed pots are always held over for at least one more season.)     

Rod Haenni, maihuenia grower extraordinario, says only older seed will germinate. Older as in ten years off the plant.

I give up, and will go for plants.
The only cactus I'll try seed of (I know that's not English) these days are Pediocactus (sileri, winkleri, despainii) and Sclerocactus, all species.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

P.S. Cold treatment is usually beneficial for seed of cold-hardy species (of practically anything).
Cold, plus patience. Two words I rarely use in the same sentence.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I tried sowing Maihuenia poeppigii once and actually got two seedlings the first year but a slug quickly put a halt to that. I discarded the pot two years later when no more seedlings appeared. Should have stored it for 10 more years then!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Here is a pretty but nasty Opuntia!!  [move]I guess that makes it pretty nasty! :rolleyes:
[/move]  Opuntia aciculata commonly called the chenille pricklypear ( don't be fooled by the common name, there is nothing soft and fuzzy about it.  :-\) This is a spinless Texas Opuntia with beautiful red flowers. It doesn't have spines to act as a pre-warning system to tell you, "Hay!! Your getting too close!!!" I can  attest to the fact, that it's way too easy. :'(

http://www.cactus-art.biz/schede/OPUNTIA/Opuntia_aciculata/Opuntia_acicu...
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=242415193

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

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