other cactus

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Prickly pears are also known as "tuna" south of the border. Nopales is the Spanish name for Prickly Pear Cactus pads. Prickly Pear Cactus produce both nopales, a vegetable, and tuna, a fruit. As a vegetable, Nopales can be used in salads, casseroles, soups, grilled and prepared in a variety of other ways.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Thanks John, I was hoping to find the etymologic meaning behind the word "tuna" as it applies to Opuntia and prickly pears (as opposed to the fidsh), the following wikipedia links describes it:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opuntia
"The fruit of prickly pears, commonly called cactus fruit, cactus fig, Indian fig or tuna in Spanish"

My understanding of "tuna" is now expanded ;)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

I was being lazy. As usual. Tuna are the pads, or the fruit, and chollas are the upright ones. The pads are also called nopales.
As to Opuntia debreczyi, the cactus on the upper right on the website is the type specimen. I think I have a plant of that from Mary Ann.
"Behaves like a species" in the wild? What on earth could that possibly mean?

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Since the topic here is "Other Cactus", what do you think of these?

             

    ----- Made ya look, didn't I... :D

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

Made ya look, didn't I 

Yes, you did.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Thought I'd post a list of the gymnocalyciums I planted this year (with Mesa Garden numbers), in trays, or dishes, or bowls (whatever) of Mexican pottery. The cactus may be hardier in the ground, but if so, too bad for them.
G. andreae 454.03
G. bruchii 458
G. calochlorum 459.2 and 459.21
G. calochlorum var. proliferum 459.33 and 459.5
Poor 459.5, it's already doomed. Tissue damage (not counting being nibbled by rodents) at temperatures not very far below freezing. Sometimes this happens because of other factors, and the plants recover, but in this case, I think not.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Nold wrote:

Poor 459.5, it's already doomed. Tissue damage (not counting being nibbled by rodents) at temperatures not very far below freezing. Sometimes this happens because of other factors, and the plants recover, but in this case, I think not.

Bob

I don't think that little fella will make it either!

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

This is Coryphantha echinus. I've had this plant five years now. It is very hardy in zone 7.
Some years it will put on both a spring and summer show.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

I found this interesting when I read it for the first time.

Some cactus growers lump the Escobaria species into the genus Coryphantha. In the older Taxonomy texts you will find this to be the case, almost all the Escobaria species, were indeed, included in the genus Coryphantha. There is however a subtle difference in the seed surfaces of the two genera.
In Coryphantha, the seed surfaces are reticulate/net-like or with a crosshatch pattern.  In Escobaria, the seed  coats are foveolate/pitted, with a dimpled pattern.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Echinus is hardy for me too.
Some botanists think the distinction in seeds is not sufficient to warrant two genera, but Anderson (in The Cactus Family) keeps Coryphantha and Escobaria.
I remember being told, years ago, that a lot of botanists were considering seeds as being the determining factor in separating genera.
Maybe one day it will be roots.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

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