other cactus

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penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Spination on the Mesa Garden viridiflora, then spination on the usual pink flowered one. The latter is in full sun. The M.G. plant is a good 80 cm tall, or would be if snow hadn't flattened it a couple of winters ago, where it fell into a plant of C. davisii, and I don't really feel like pulling them apart ....

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Nold wrote:

The M.G. plant is a good 80 cm tall, or would be if snow hadn't flattened it a couple of winters ago, where it fell into a plant of C. davisii, and I don't really feel like pulling them apart ....

Bob

You would no doubt feel something if you tried!! ;)

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

The worst one is Echinocereus fendleri. I wouldn't be surprised if it had a tiny amount of toxin in the spine tips.
Not as bad as gooseberries or New Mexican locust, but still bad.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Nold wrote:

Some weird ones. First is, I guess, Opuntia basilaris var. brachyclada (doing the right thing by shriveling) and a mystery opuntia I got from Kelly Grummons which he collected near Briggsdale, Colorado.
Some people have suggested this is O. arenaria, but that grows in Texas.
Neither has ever flowered.

Bob

I've had luck flowering Opuntia basilaris var. brachyclada. Looks just like the standard form maybe a touch smaller.

The mystery Opuntia must be the one he lists as Opuntia polyacantha ‘Peter Pan’.
I have a similar polyacantha that stays almost miniature and never flowers either. I got it from a grower, who got it from a grower, who got it from a grower etc... Wounder if it's the same clone? :-\

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Here is Cylindropuntia acanthocarpa var. coloradensis found growing in the  Sonoran and Mojave deserts.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

The mystery Opuntia must be the one he lists as Opuntia polyacantha ‘Peter Pan’.   

That could be. I seem to recall it having a name in the nursery this year.
You can even pick the pads up with your fingers.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Wow, John..that's a new one for me..

I am posting a few images I was sorting today (of cacti): random things that should interest those of us "stuck" on cacti, beginning with...

1) Opuntia "fragilis" (now with a Hungarian name I can't spell--for the spineless ones ex s Utah) This one is named 'Potato' and the plant is in Bob Nold's garden..I was a few days early for the full bloom, drats!
2) The second is a pot where I accidentally put two Escobarias, one (the purple one) obviously vivipara. Any guesses on the flesh colored one?
3) The last is Escobaria vivipara v. vivipara from east central Kansas: I took that picture near the Flint Hills, probably just about the easternmost extent of the species. Quite different from those further west (the area it grows in probably gets 30" of rain!)

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

I like that acanthocarpa.... Think I tried it once, but it was a cutting, and the woodier the cutting, the harder it is to root.
If I knew then what I know now, I would've cut the spines off about 2cm from the end with a razor blade (what a fun job), let them callus, then dust with sulfur, and laid the joint down to root.
Since cholla joints and tuna pads have this tendency to fall over after I stick them in dirt, or whatever, I use landscaping staples to hold them in place.
Opuntia debreczyi. I think the name fragilis is just fine. FNA doesn't recognize debreczyi (which doesn't mean anything). It's apparently based on observations of a plant grown in Hungary from a collection by Mary Ann Heacock. http://www.tropicos.org/Name/50291306

I prefer lumping to splitting when it comes to the Cactaceae. Otherwise every single cactus would have its own name.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I keep seeing the term "tuna pads".  To a non-cactusphile, what does this term mean?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Here is what Dave Ferguson has to say about it.
http://opuntiads.com/html/opuntia-debreczyi.html

A synonym for the larger forms of  debreczyi in the trade is 'rutila' or 'super rutila'

A couple of the larger forms One almost spineless, the other with spines.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

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