Iris cristata and small woodland Iris

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Ron, I used a decomposed bark mulch as a seed cover (mulch), many woodlanders seem to respond well to the treatment. I like using peat flats which sit on the bare ground, because moisture tends to be more even with these porous flats.  The flats are sown and set out in summer after seed is harvested; during the summer the flats are in shade and sprinkled with water fairly regularly, they do dry out but never become totally parched. In autumn and winter they fend for themselves. In spring if there's a long expanse of dry weather (as there is now) then I resume watering.

And quite suddenly, Iris odaesanensis is in flower, with many more buds coming.  This colony represents self-sown seedlings gathered up and planted together, along with my own deliberate seed-grown plants, the first year in many where it has really decided to flower well.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Thanks Mark. Obviously a very successful method.
Superb I. odaesanensis.  :o

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

The flowers on I. odaesanensis seem to go over fairly quickly, but I noticed if one plants patches here and there in the garden, with micro-climates, the bloom time is somewhat staggered, so I have a couple patches just coming into bloom, while this big patch is fading.

On the other hand, Iris koreana is flowering lustily, here's a photo taken 2 days ago, where this large patch seems to bloom on one side of the mat and moves to flowering on the other side.  Even though it rained today, the patch is now in full bloom covering the entire foliage mat, but didn't catch a photo.  I had planted a form of Iris cristata right next to it (foliage visible in upper right of I. koreana leaves), in hope of promiscuous garden activity ;)   It's great having this species in a woodland setting to bring bright yellow into the woodland Iris spectrum.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Just love these woodland iris!

Last Chapter meeting we had a talk on Iris and I had the opportunity to remind club members  that I donated seedlings of I. koreana and I. odaesanensis last year, and would this year, too.  Later, Barb came up to me and said she had gotten one of the I. koreana and it had bloomed.  Yes, another happy customer, but why does it always seems that other people grow whatever I give them better than I do!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Rick, from your story I take it that your seedlings of I. koreana have not bloomed? My plant, which flowers magnificently every year, previously never flowered (not a single flower) in a different part of the garden, just moving it seemed to do the trick.  The same with Iris odaesanensis, I'm now spotting them around in various places, and in some (too dry) places they rarely flower or even die out, but in other spots (like in the photos I recently showed), they flower very well indeed, in other spots they flower sporadically.  Not sure what specifically they want.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

It's too early to think that the placement is problematic.  My first bloom this year, while her first bloom last year, seems to be almost a norm.  We'll see.  I noted your placement observations last year.  Thanks for reminding me, Mark.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Anticipation!  Judging from the quantity of buds on various Iris cristata forms, it will be a banner year for them.  Two views of the largest form, I. cristata 'Edgard Anderson', on the left taken in rain on 05-09-2013, and on the right taken today 05-10-2013.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Great looking Irises- love the big patches...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark, you have quite a collection of these irises! It is impressive :o
I have tried some but the small seedlings are always eaten when I try to establish them in the garden so they never get the chance to bulk up :-\

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I was comparing a couple new recent additions to my garden, the first was Iris cristata 'Powder Blue Giant', added last year (2012).  I'm not overly crazy about it, the stems are so long and flopping that the flowers hang down into the dirt.  In this photo, I had propped up the front flower so that it could be seen.

Three views below of a newly acquired Iris cristata 'Eco Orchid Giant', introduced by Don Jacobs in 1992. It looks similar to 'Powder Blue Giant'. The flowers on Eco Orchid Giant are beautiful indeed, and scented like roses (myself and a friend agree). It seems that these large-flowered types have a hard time holding up their flowers, although this one seems sturdier than Powder Blue Giant.

By the way, I bought this delightful Iris from NARGS forumist Amy Olmstead (thanks Amy!), I happened to run into her at Tower Hill Botanic Garden in Boylston MA, with a table of fine plants for sale, a few weeks back during the American Primrose Society show.  Great running into you Amy.

Iris cristata 'Eco Orchid Giant':

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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