Iris cristata and small woodland Iris

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I must have fat thumbs ;).  Interesting to see that annual progression, I can detect the tendency for this iris species to create a "rhizome donut", with flowers and growth moving to the outer ring.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

McDonough wrote:

  Interesting to see that annual progression, I can detect the tendency for this iris species to create a "rhizome donut", with flowers and growth moving to the outer ring.

Probably.  Is this how Iris minutoaurea behaves for you, Mark?  After I took the photo, I remove the leaves in the middle, and there was still some green in the very center.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

                     
Mine are bigger than my thumb. :D  The flower measures exactly one inch across.

Isn't an inch defined as the width of a thumb ;)

A very nice species anyway!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Today was my annual field trip to Garden Vision Epimediums "open nursery weekend"; a fine spring day.  Not only are there epimediums, but also some nice woodland Iris.  The photos show a booty box of newly purchased treasures.  The biggest surprise was I. cristata 'Montrose White', a 2010 Joe Pye Weed's Garden 2010 introduction. The beautiful flowers are really large, surprisingly so, 3" diameter.  It is said to be a robust grower.

One that I lost due to mole/vole tunneling is I. cristata 'Powder Blue Giant', with 3-1/2" light blue flowers, happy to get it back for a mere $6.

Two others I bought were I. cristata 'Little Jay', a dwarf deep blue selection, and I. verna 'Cleo Chapel Road', a 2012 Joe Pye Weed's Garden introduction, a colorful form collected bt Darrell Probst near Cleo Chapel Road, South Carolina.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Nice batch of plants- sounds like a great event to attend :) What are the pink flowers- first glance I was thinking Phalaenopsis (tropical orchids), which of course can't be...lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

McDonough wrote:

I. cristata 'Montrose White'

I. cristata 'Powder Blue Giant'

I. cristata 'Little Jay'

I. verna 'Cleo Chapel Road'

Sigh.... :-\ :rolleyes:

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

cohan wrote:

Nice batch of plants- sounds like a great event to attend :) What are the pink flowers- first glance I was thinking Phalaenopsis (tropical orchids), which of course can't be...lol

The pink flowered plant is Phlox stolonifera 'Wister Pink'.  All of these carpeting woodland phlox are wonderful garden plants, easy and indestructable, but as the name implies (stolonifera) it's a spreader, and must be given room to spread.  There are many many named cultivars of this Eastern USA species.  Here's a photo showing the plant and the creeping stoloniferous runners.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I'll have to catch up with some more Iris that have bloomed, but I'll jump ahead with one I found in bloom tonight.  When I get home in waning light, I do my "garden walkabout" and I find new things in flowers.  Here's Iris verna 'Brumback Blue', a wonderful dwarf woodland species, this one selected for its bright color.  I'm so pleased to see the first flowers open.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

McDonough wrote:

cohan wrote:

Nice batch of plants- sounds like a great event to attend :) What are the pink flowers- first glance I was thinking Phalaenopsis (tropical orchids), which of course can't be...lol

The pink flowered plant is Phlox stolonifera 'Wister Pink'.  All of these carpeting woodland phlox are wonderful garden plants, easy and indestructable, but as the name implies (stolonifera) it's a spreader, and must be given room to spread.  There are many many named cultivars of this Eastern USA species.  Here's a photo showing the plant and the creeping stoloniferous runners.

[attachthumb=1]

Interesting, don't think I've seen any of these, something to look into and watch for if they are hardy enough..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

cohan wrote:

McDonough wrote:

cohan wrote:

Nice batch of plants- sounds like a great event to attend :) What are the pink flowers- first glance I was thinking Phalaenopsis (tropical orchids), which of course can't be...lol

The pink flowered plant is Phlox stolonifera 'Wister Pink'.  All of these carpeting woodland phlox are wonderful garden plants, easy and indestructable, but as the name implies (stolonifera) it's a spreader, and must be given room to spread.  There are many many named cultivars of this Eastern USA species.  Here's a photo showing the plant and the creeping stoloniferous runners.

[attachthumb=1]

Interesting, don't think I've seen any of these, something to look into and watch for if they are hardy enough..

Phlox stolonifera is completely hardy here, Cohan.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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