Iris cristata and small woodland Iris

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Excellent!  I've never had one of these through a bloom in the fall. Since we were talking about how much a named Iris cristata might cost in Europe, how much did you get it for, or was it shared by a friend.  With the name 'Eco Little Bluebird' this has to be one named by Don Jacobs from Decatur Georgia (Eco Gardens)... all his named selections are named in the form of Eco-this or Eco-that.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I don't think I have ever had an Iris cristata bloom out of season.

McDonough wrote:

all his named selections are named in the form of Eco-this or Eco-that.

I actually like the Eco- this/that, Lakeside this/that, this/that zam system.  It tells me more about the cultivars at a glance.  

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

McDonough wrote:

Excellent!  I've never had one of these through a bloom in the fall. Since we were talking about how much a named Iris cristata might cost in Europe, how much did you get it for, or was it shared by a friend.  With the name 'Eco Little Bluebird' this has to be one named by Don Jacobs from Decatur Georgia (Eco Gardens)... all his named selections are named in the form of Eco-this or Eco-that.

Mark,

it's a selection from Don Jacobs indeed. I bought it for only 5 euro's from a local nursery....not very expensive :D but it was the only cultivar they were selling...they don't grow any other I. cristata cultivars.

BTW, they sold it as I. 'Little Bluebird'. But after a search on the web...it was clear the original name was "ECO little Bluebird'

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Wim, then it was a "good find" to come across a named form.  Most of mine are "shutting down" for the season, with the leaves yellowing and passing into dormancy.  Iris verna on the other hand, is looking spiffy and perky with dark shiny foliage.  In the photo taken today is I. verna var. smalliana 'Brumback Blue' that I purchased from Garden Vision Epimediums this spring, it was $8.00.  It was past flowering season when I bought it, but I'm pleased that it has already more than doubled in size with more low-ascending fans.  This cultivar is supposed to be a "prolific bloomer" so I'm anxious to see flowers next spring.

Some links on Iris verna and its two varieties (var. smalliana, var. verna)
http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/beauty/iris/dwarfwoodland/iris_verna.shtml
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=IRVE
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=IRVES
http://efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=8461&flora_id=1

Flower photos, the best forms are deep blue and have bold gold flare spots:

http://tenn.bio.utk.edu/vascular/database/vascular-photos-enlarge.asp?CategoryID=Monocots&FamilyID=Iridaceae&GenusID=Iris&SpeciesID=verna%20var.%20smalliana&PhotoNameID=ir_vern&PhotographerNameID=Mark%20Pistrang

http://tenn.bio.utk.edu/vascular/database/vascular-photos-enlarge.asp?CategoryID=Monocots&FamilyID=Iridaceae&GenusID=Iris&SpeciesID=verna%20var.%20smalliana&PhotoNameID=ir_vern_smal1&PhotographerNameID=B.%20Eugene%20Wofford

http://www.flickr.com/photos/alan_cressler/3464938050/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/22032600@N04/5614180632/

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

McDonough wrote:

Wim, then it was a "good find" to come across a named form. 

Yeah, I thought so too  ;D ;D

McDonough wrote:

Iris verna on the other hand, is looking spiffy and perky with dark shiny foliage.  In the photo taken today is I. verna var. smalliana 'Brumback Blue' that I purchased from Garden Vision Epimediums this spring, it was $8.00.  It was past flowering season when I bought it, but I'm pleased that it has already more than doubled in size with more low-ascending fans.  This cultivar is supposed to be a "prolific bloomer" so I'm anxious to see flowers next spring.

Some links on Iris verna and its two varieties (var. smalliana, var. verna)
http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/beauty/iris/dwarfwoodland/iris_verna.shtml
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=IRVE
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=IRVES
http://efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=8461&flora_id=1

Flower photos, the best forms are deep blue and have bold gold flare spots:
http://tenn.bio.utk.edu/vascular/database/vascular-photos-enlarge.asp?CategoryID=Monocots&FamilyID=Iridaceae&GenusID=Iris&SpeciesID=verna%20var.%20smalliana&PhotoNameID=ir_vern&PhotographerNameID=Mark%20Pistrang
http://tenn.bio.utk.edu/vascular/database/vascular-photos-enlarge.asp?CategoryID=Monocots&FamilyID=Iridaceae&GenusID=Iris&SpeciesID=verna%20var.%20smalliana&PhotoNameID=ir_vern_smal1&PhotographerNameID=B.%20Eugene%20Wofford
http://www.flickr.com/photos/alan_cressler/3464938050/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/22032600@N04/5614180632/

Wow,

just took a look at the flower-pics. That's a very nice species, I'll be on the lookout for that one.

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

On this cold mid November day, I took a photo showing the difference between Iris henryi on the left (very narrow foliage, evergreen) and I. odaesanensis on the right (persistant dried remains of foliage, not evergreen).  Both species are planted at the top of a mound, so they are grown rather dry.  Plants of Iris odaesanensis on flat ground elsewhere in the garden have leaves in a semi-dormant state... some green at the base but drying and going into dormancy, but with strong green shoots in evidence at the base.

Iris minutoaurea, one of the tiniest Iris in bloom, has surprisingly long foliage after bloom, that persists all season long.  In this photo you can see it has mostly gone brown and drying, but it is extremely tough and persistent, and must be cut off in spring to enjoy the best display in sping.  This clump is long overdue for being divided.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

The wonderful Iris koreana is in splendid bloom right now, fully a month earlier than normal due to our extra warm spring season.  Iris koreana and I. odaesanensis are species that Darrell Probst has introduced from Korea, and glad he did, because they are easy and delightful small woodland plants, a perfect compliment to our familiar woodland Iris such as I. cristata

http://www.signa.org/index.pl?Iris-koreana
http://www.signa.org/index.pl?Iris-odaesanensis
http://www.plantdelights.com/Iris-odaesanensis-Perennial-Mt-Odae-Iris/pr...

This clump of I. koreana has grown well and spread to a sizeable clump in three years.  Before that, I had it planted in another location where it was shrinking in size and barely bloomed; probably too dry a location previously.  Funny, the buds opened on the south side of the clump first, and now progressing south to north :D

As I'm only able to catch a few photo after work at dusk, the photos are a bit dark, maybe I'll get a better photo today (weekend day) with better light.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

To compare, here is the other Korean species, Iris odaesanensis, apparently named for a Mt. Odae in Korea where the species is found. I have a large patch that used to flower well, but no longer flowers, or sputters out only a couple of blooms.  The patch shown in the first photo is a combination of some self-sown seedlings, and a few seed-grown plants from my sowing, the division between my two groupings now grown in and merged into one patch.  This year it has a smattering of blooms, but not a shear mass of bloom as I have seen them at Garden Vision Epimediums nursery, not sure what will stimulate better bloom.  My plan is to move them around to various parts of the garden to find a spot to its liking, as has happened with Iris koreana.

Iris odaesanensis.  Notice the yellow spot or halo in the closeup view.  Darrell Probst also selected a form that looks similar, except for a fine brown line around the yellow halo, both forms have been available from Garden Vision Epimedium.

A closeup of Iris koreana today:

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Your irises are spectacular, Mark!  I wonder how hardy those species are?  Can anyone comment?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

They are darling, Mark. 

I have some year old seedlings of odaesanensis and koreana from SIGNA seed that I will be planting out this spring.  We'll see how they do. 

Mark, keep us informed if you make anymore determinations regarding climate preference.  I think we would all benefit.

Iris minutoaurea will be making a show soon...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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