Eriogonum lobbii

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04
Eriogonum lobbii

Yes it's another of the High elevation buckwheats. Eriogonum lobbii found locally in the Sierra Nevada Range. This one grows in the Northern Sierras of CA & NV. It continues on a path across Northern CA to the coastal mountain Ranges were it just crosses the southern border of OR.

I have found this growing on Slide Mountain at 9500'-9700'. It is a low clumping/mat with rather large grayish green tomentose leaves and a long tap root. What what sets this alpine Eriogonum off from the rest is the way in which it displays it flowers. They are splayed out on the surface of the granitic scree around the plant. I have found two color forms white/cream or rosy/cherry. This seems to be easy to grow in the garden, given of course a well drained planting medium.

http://www.calflora.org/cgi-bin/species_query.cgi?where-calrecnum=9935
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?where-genre=Plant&where-taxo...
http://www.plantsystematics.org/reveal/pbio/eriog/oligogonum/lobbii.html
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ERLO2
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=250060369
http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/get_county_map.pl?taxon_id=24839&hcod...

The pictures will show both color forms. These are from the same population

Peter George
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-03

You point out that this one grows in a granitic scree. Can I infer then that it does not require an alkaline soil?

Peter George, Petersham, MA (north central MA, close to the NH/VT borders), zones 5b and 6 around the property.

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

You are correct. It is found on granitic and volcanic soils.

I find that many of the Erogenous found growing on specific soil types are not all that picky. I think they have developed the ability to grow were there is a lack of competition from grasses and sagebrush. I would call them opportunistic.

Lots of sun, good drainage and mineral soils with low in organic content seem to be what they want. They are very drought tolerant, the lower elevation species from western NV thrive on as little six inches of precipitation a year. A lot of them are found growing on slopes composed of a matrix of, volcanic rock and volcanically derived mineral clays. The high alpines of course are covered by heavy snow packs in winter and occasional light summer showers but the drainage is very sharp. These granitic screes are the texture of course loose sand.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

McGregorUS
McGregorUS's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-12-18

Love the pictures - this really is one I shall look out for.

Malcolm McGregor
Global Moderator/NARGS Editor
East Yorkshire, UK

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Me too!
John, you said buckwheats are easy from cuttings. It is more likely that I come across seeds than cuttings, so are they as easy from seeds as from cuttings?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Hoy
Yes they are easy from seed. As with most alpines cold stratification is the key. I use the typical lean gritty alpine mix in my pots. I sprinkle the seed over the top dressing, mist them down into the mix and set them out doors. Then let nature take it's course. I planted seed for seven Eriogonum species last year and had success with all of them. I got two to three plants of each species (plenty for my needs), out of ten seeds per pot sown.
I do not know if the ungerminated seed are on a multiple dormace cycles or not. My guess is that they are, given their natural habitats.
I have several species that have been in the garden for six years now. They are seeding around nicely on their own. As young plants I find them easy to transplant. I may lose one or two out of ten moved or potted up.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

HughGmail
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-07-08

Weiser wrote:

I have several species that have been in the garden for six years now. They are seeding around nicely on their own. As young plants I find them easy to transplant. I may lose one or two out of ten moved or potted up.

I too have had great success with both seeding around for certain species and the ability to transplant whilst they are young.  My rock garden is very lean, being a mix of small gravel, sand, and very little soil.  The seeds nestle down easily in the gravel mulch.  Specific species that have seeded around for me are Eriogonum umbellatum humistratum (very choice leaf color), E. jamesii (not a surprise given they are native to my area), E gracilipes, and a few others.

Hugh Mac Millan
Former NARGS Web Master, Moderator
Eriogonum enthusiast
Zone 5+- - Front Range, Colorado (Denver area)

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

This is one that hasn't been a stayer for me here in the northeast.  Maybe three years was the longest it stayed, although it did flower.  We don't have reliable snow cover in the winter and that may have something to do with it.  Didn't get enough germination to try it in a variety of places but always grew it in a very coarse, fast-draining scree.

McGregorUS
McGregorUS's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-12-18

Sounds like my experience of germinating the seed is pretty much like other people. Lean mix, sow with only the least covering, leave in the cold for spring to come. My problem is getting any of them to flower which as yet none have. But I still love the plants and have to remember seeing them in the wild.

Malcolm McGregor
Global Moderator/NARGS Editor
East Yorkshire, UK

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McGregor wrote:

Sounds like my experience of germinating the seed is pretty much like other people. Lean mix, sow with only the least covering, leave in the cold for spring to come. My problem is getting any of them to flower which as yet none have. But I still love the plants and have to remember seeing them in the wild.

Malcolm, if you don't get them to flower, I certainly will not either! But I have to try - and the plants are decorative even without flowers too.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I have grown E. lobbii, where they were planted in ceramic pots and grown outside, lasting for 2-3 years, and actually flowered (modestly) with in a sort of burnished orange color.  That was perhaps 10 years ago.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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