Ferns

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Geo F-W
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Joined: 2012-02-13

I think your climate is slightly warmer than here (-11.8 ° C this year) Tim.

If you like small ferns in rockery, you should try the Pellaea. They are little beauties, Pellaea atropurpurea, Pellaea rotundifolia (which is often sold as indoor plant, but fits comfortably in the outdoors in pots or in rockery, the sun), Pellaea falcata (ditto).
Cryptogramma crispa is also a good rockery fern, not necessarily easy to culture, it grows on acid rocks.

Woodsia polystichoides is not bad either.

Geoffrey F-Winterspoon.
Arras, Northern France, USDA zone 8 (temps min -12°c), cool and humid summer and cool winter.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/29627653@N04/sets/72157627728518944/

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Yes I think I will definitely try some of these smaller ferns. Rachel Lever at Aberconwy Nursery has been growing many of these, especially the Cheilanthes. It would be nice to hear more of people's experiences growing them in the garden, but I imagine few people do. I haven't tried Pellaea species, so will certainly look out for these.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

-11.8 sounds positively sub-tropical to me  ;D
Those small rockery ferns are very interesting for sure! Be sure to share anyone who has  or gets any!
I've mentioned before becoming very fascinated with small ferns growing in seasonally/dry places in Mexico/Central America along with succulents such as Echeveria! would love to get some of those to grow indoors with succulents, but have not found any :(

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Allison
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Joined: 2010-04-08

Ferns are one of my main interests in the garden. I'm in zone 4 and of the small rock-loving ferns, several Woodsias, ilvensis, alpina and oregana all do well. Cryptogramma crispa is difficult, I'm hoping my few remaining plants make it through the winter. They are hard to establish. Several Aspleniums, trichomanes both sub-species and platyneuron are great in shady rock walls, as is Cryptogramma stelleri. Cystopteris fragilis is nice although it goes dormant in dry weather. Common Polypody (P. virginiana) is all over my rockery. Adiantum aleuticum, spp. subpumilum, and of course the Fragrant Fern, Dryopteris fragrans are terrific. I have other small ones started, some planted out last summer, but I don't know yet how they will come through the winter.

I can collect spores and send them to the exchange if there is enough interest.

Gardening on a wooded rocky ridge in the Ottawa Valley, Canada. Cold winters (-30C) and hot, humid summers. Nuts about native plants, ferns, pottery, my family, and Border Collies.

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Lis - I would certainly be interested in spores. I did join the British Pteridological Society mainly so I could try a wider range of ferns from spores, but so far haven't really started growing many. They are a group (the rock ferns) that I would very like to propagate as we develop the nursery again, and I used to grow a number of cheilanthes. These, however, are generally difficult outside here so it's good to hear of experiences with other small ferns.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I can collect spores of Asplenium septentrionale if anybody is interested. And Lis, Cryptogramma crispa is very common here - I haven't tried it in the garden - but if you need more spores that's easy to get hold of!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Cool one, Trond!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

cohan wrote:

Cool one, Trond!

I don't know what to think about a fern that tricks me into thinking it is a grass... :-\

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Allison
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-04-08

RickR wrote:

I don't know what to think about a fern that tricks me into thinking it is a grass... :-\

You think, 'Wow, that is sooo cool!' of course.

Any chance of A. septentrionale spores in the seedex soon?

Gardening on a wooded rocky ridge in the Ottawa Valley, Canada. Cold winters (-30C) and hot, humid summers. Nuts about native plants, ferns, pottery, my family, and Border Collies.

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Lis wrote:

RickR wrote:

I don't know what to think about a fern that tricks me into thinking it is a grass... :-\

You think, 'Wow, that is sooo cool!' of course.

That's what I said  ;D I always like plants that don't look like they are supposed to :)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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