Ferns

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Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Mark, I'm amazed how lush the ferns look next to your deck - there must be quite a bit of moisture down below. The 'Lady Fern', which is so beautiful, struggles in our dry summers and I can only grow it on the north side of a greenhouse where it gets run off from the rain. However, all the forms of Polystichum do really well, coping with drought pretty well, as do quite a few Dryopteris. But they don't approach the wonderful vigour of your plants. Woodwardia unigemmate, one of the chain ferns, coped surprisingly well with a long dry summer spell a couple of years ago - I had expected it to suffer badly. It could make a magnificent specimen under your conditions, and some selections have marvellous red new growth. It roots down at the tips of the long(!) fronds and spreads over quite an area this way.

I too am fascinated by the more xeric species, but generally they are grown as show plants in pots in the UK, even though at least some should be able to grow in the garden given winter protection. Sue Olsen's book is superb and makes you realise just how diverse ferns are. They do seem to be being grown more in gardens here, which is good news, and they are fun to raise from spores (and in my very limited experience the xeric Cheilanthes are relatively easy to raise in this way, probably tolerating drier conditions better than some).

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I love ferns, though they are uncommon locally ( at least on our property, don't get into woods on other folks property much, and they are not roadside plants!).. I know of exactly two spots they occur on the family farm ( two very different species, neither of which I know to name) and one spot on my acreage, which I assume is a native-my mother thought my aunt may have planted it, but I doubt she'd have planted such a little thing..
Besides that, I have two small pots with wild collections from the farm awaiting beds--one of the first tw mentioned above, a tiny thing from a wet dark place, also a Botrychium virginianum..
And in one ill-chosen bed I have a couple of potentially large ferns bought as loose rhizomes (? sold loose in a bin, one growing point each) a couple of years ago and planted in a spot I didn't realise was so dry... I prob should move them....(best time of year for that?)

I'll try to get pics of all of the above, I do have shots to edit of those in the bush....

I'm also really interested in small xeric ferns to grow indoors- viewing pictures of Echeveria and other Mexican/Central American succulents in habitat, I saw many small ferns growing with them--these are presumably semi-shaded rocky areas, dry in winter.. indoors I wqould grow them with my C+S.. no luck finding spores, so far though... Tim, you mentioned folks growing some in Britain, know of any sources or growers I could ask for spores? Looking for the smallest plants possible, 30cm tall would be a maximum, preferably much less..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

cohan wrote:

I'm also really interested in small xeric ferns to grow indoors- viewing pictures of Echeveria and other Mexican/Central American succulents in habitat, I saw many small ferns growing with them--these are presumably semi-shaded rocky areas, dry in winter.. indoors I wqould grow them with my C+S.. no luck finding spores, so far though... Tim, you mentioned folks growing some in Britain, know of any sources or growers I could ask for spores? Looking for the smallest plants possible, 30cm tall would be a maximum, preferably much less..

What about this one, Cohan? Asplenium septentrionale The Norwegian name is Olavsskjegg - beard of Olav (an ancient holy king btw).

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Cohan, the British Pteridological Society has a superb spore list with many xeric species and I expect most growers who exhibit them are involved with the BPS. I have only grown a few Cheilanthes in the past and used to collect spores and put them in the seed exchanges. One of the finest sources in the UK is Rachel Lever of Aberconwy Nursery, but few others grow the smaller ferns.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

A very odd fern, Trond - very different from those I am used to... what do the individual fronds look like?  Could you post a picture?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I am now in Oslo but if I find one tomorrow I'll post a picture. Or else you have to wait some weeks!
Maybe Stephen has a picture.

Or you can take a look here while waiting:
http://floragutt.com/Smaaburknefamilien.htm

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Wow, really  unusual!  Thanks for the link.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Trond, that looks like a very nice one to grow--by its surroundings, seems maybe it would work with Semps, and obviously Sedum  ;D
I'm certainly interested in growing ferns outdoors, though its quite a separate issue from looking for tender (anything less than -40 is tender ;) xerics for indoors...

Tim, maybe I will try begging on SRGC.. There must be easily a dozen or more societies for various sorts of plants I grow and or love, indoors and out, that I already can't afford to join ;) ..nonetheless, I will check to see if BPS is online..lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Plummer
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-10-01

On a garden tour last year, I remarked to the owners that I used ferns like they used Hostas. There were a half dozen species on our lot or in the surrounding woods when we bought it almost 50 years ago. I started out modestly adding to the collection a few ferns at a time planting them around the house foundation and randomly along the paths.  I had access to Polystichum acrostichoides, Osmunda claytonia and Adiantum pedatum. Many of these have been undisturbed for 40 years and form impressive stands. Then several years ago I started collecting ferns in earnest and to accommodate them I cut a new trail through my back woods with Dryopteris along one side and Polystichum and Athyrium  along the other, naming it my Pteridophyte Ptrail.
What are my favorites: Adiantum pedata, A. venustum, Osmunda cinnamonea, O. regalis, Dryopteris marginalis, D. goldiana, Polystichun acrostichoides, P. braunii, Asplenium trichomanes and Diplazium pycnocarpum.

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

your fernery sounds wonderful, Plummer! We'd love to see photos :)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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