Syneilesis

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Geo F-W
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Joined: 2012-02-13

I must admit that I have great difficulties with Diphylleia cymosa...
I do not know exactly why...
It didn't seem to enjoy the garden soil, can be too clayey...And slugs do great damages also.
In the garden of a friend in Belgium, the Diphylleia are monstrous, wealthy, it is a magnificent spectacle.
I'd have to try it somewhere else, but usually, after a failure, I'm a bit "chilly" (I don't know if this expression exists in English ^^) to try again...

Saruma henryi is one of my favorite plants in the woodland yes. A very easy plant which has the merit of naturalizing and whose flower color is the one I prefer at this time.
There's a scene in the garden that takes me to heaven every year, the Epimedium 'Flowers of Sulphur' surrounded by Saruma henryi with Paris quadrifolia and polyphylla and Polygonatum yunnanense, lined with and Selaginella sanguinolenta and kraussiana.

I love the Aristolochiaceae, I try to cultivate some Aristolochia here, as A.tomentosa, A.macrophylla, A.debilis, or A.clematitis A.mandschurica. My friend Mark Brown has a small collection.

Geoffrey F-Winterspoon.
Arras, Northern France, USDA zone 8 (temps min -12°c), cool and humid summer and cool winter.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/29627653@N04/sets/72157627728518944/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Paris is a genus that I would love to try, fascinating plants, but seldom ever offered here.  Trying to get a few more Polygonatums introduced in the garden, I have failed with some that I've tried.  You mentioned in a previous message the genus Chloranthus, one that I first encountered at Darrell Probst's nursery, utterly unique and charming plants; I must beg a piece from Darrell sometime.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Geo F-W
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Joined: 2012-02-13

Paris are amazing plants, some are really impressive. I do grow a few here, Paris quadrifolia, which is common in parts of France, Paris polyphylla, Paris polyphylla yunnanensis alba, Paris japonica and Paris vietnamensis, but there are many other equally ornamental. (look at these pictures : http://www.greenmilenursery.be/photo_paris.html at Robin Callens's nursery in Belgium)

For Chloranthus, I was especially interested in them through Mark Brown (whose garden is based on an demential project retracing the evolution of flowering plants), because the Chloranthaceae are a very old family, phylogenetically speaking, almost fossils.
By cons, they are very slow to expand, their only fault! ^ ^

Geoffrey F-Winterspoon.
Arras, Northern France, USDA zone 8 (temps min -12°c), cool and humid summer and cool winter.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/29627653@N04/sets/72157627728518944/

kalle-k.dk
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Joined: 2012-04-05

I mean Syneilesis palmata is one of the best woodland plants and there are several Japanese forms. They come up early and still where we can get frost at night, but it seem that they not get any damaged.

Karl Kristensen
Denmark.
www.kalle-k.dk

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

kalle-k.dk wrote:

I mean Syneilesis palmata is one of the best woodland plants and there are several Japanese forms. They come up early and still where we can get frost at night, but it seem that they not get any damaged.

I would love to grow them but the slugs have damaged them every time I have tried :'( Maybe they tolerate frost but not slugs >:(

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Geo F-W
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-02-13

Hoy wrote:

kalle-k.dk wrote:

I mean Syneilesis palmata is one of the best woodland plants and there are several Japanese forms. They come up early and still where we can get frost at night, but it seem that they not get any damaged.

I would love to grow them but the slugs have damaged them every time I have tried :'( Maybe they tolerate frost but not slugs >:(

Indeed, here too slus are public enemy number one, a constant struggle...

Karl, your selections are superb, I grow 'Kikko here, but in pots, precisely because of the slugs ...

I love your site, since a long time, bravo!

Geoffrey F-Winterspoon.
Arras, Northern France, USDA zone 8 (temps min -12°c), cool and humid summer and cool winter.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/29627653@N04/sets/72157627728518944/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

kalle-k.dk wrote:

I mean Syneilesis palmata is one of the best woodland plants and there are several Japanese forms. They come up early and still where we can get frost at night, but it seem that they not get any damaged.

Karl, those Syneilesis are the epitome of horticultural whimsy, just fantastic, and I'm totally smitten with what you show. Are these generally available in Europe?  I assume these all come out of Japan, did you import them or obtain them from a European nursery?

Slugs are no problem here in my dryish New England garden, so I suspect if these whimsical Syneilesis were to become available here, they should grow just fine in our climate.  Thanks for showing these wonders.

Karl, in your experience, do these varieties come true from seed, or do seed-grown plants offer lots of variability?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Very interesting, Karl! I will be happy to hear the answers to Mark's questions....

Does anyone know what the Japanese growers are doing to get so many variegates and other forms? Is it simply sowing thousands to find the one sport? Or do they have some techniques to speed mutations?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

kalle-k.dk
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Joined: 2012-04-05

No they are very rare in Europe and I got them from a Japanese friend. About the varieties forms of Japanese plants I think it is because they are very good plants man and they got lot of material in the nature, as you also see in Trillium in US and we see in our nature plants.
Syneilesis belongs to Asteraceae family and my wife and I have sown several plants from that family before and with luck, but we have any luck with Syneilesis I don’t know why. I have divided a few of them and then I also know they are right.

Karl Kristensen
Denmark.
www.kalle-k.dk

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I ask because I look at a lot of plants in nature, and we have many species here that are very very common, so I see thousands of them in a season- and never any variegates! I've seen one small willow/Salix in nature, that seemed to be variegated, and that is the only thing! The Syneilesis makes me think of our native Petasites palmatum -very nice leaves, woodland plant, and very very common, the leaves are everywhere in our woodland- I have never seen a variegated leaf......

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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