Syneilesis

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Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Rick, if you ever get seed......what a great sale you must have.  Wish I could be there!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I should add, as negligible as the flowers are, they do have a sweet scent.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Mine haven't opened yet.  Withholding a final judgment, but so far it looks like prenanthus is the better flower.  Actually, we have a very nice wild pendant species that grows in the moist areas here.

Will see about seed, Todd.  Although in the garden, one I planted did not flower, and the other, the flower stem broke off.  Seed would be from woefully underpotted plants, and therefore may not be in the best of health.  It is surprising, however, to observe the tenacity of the species under these adverse conditions.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Nothing to offer here re. flowering... I still have only single-leaf plants, but I'm pleased that both S. aconitifolia and S. palmata have made it through 2 winters now!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Skulski wrote:

Nothing to offer here re. flowering... I still have only single-leaf plants, but I'm pleased that both S. aconitifolia and S. palmata have made it through 2 winters now!

Winters - no problem! Slugs are!!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Mine haven't opened yet.  Withholding a final judgment, but so far it looks like prenanthus is the better flower.  Actually, we have a very nice wild pendant species that grows in the moist areas here.

I have grown a couple "not too bad" Prenanthes species in the past, the nodding flowers on some are kind of "interesting".  So, here's two much better photos of Syneilesis aconitifolia flowers today.  The flowers opened more, and when adorned with "protruding bits" it is an amusing site at close hand, the sweet scent of the flowers wafting on this hot day (90 F, +32 C).

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Howey
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-05-17

What a lovely plant!  One to covet.  Ordered seed from the Seedex last year but got something quite different that I'm still trying to identify.  Will try again this year and hope I get the right seed this time.  Did someone mention the flowers are pendant?  One of the photos shows them on long stems that poke out (extrude?) beyond the leaf - unlike the Podophyllum peltatum it is often likened to.  Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

My talk of pendant flowers was about Prenanthus spp.  Syneilesis flowers are upright and do extend way above the foliage, as the previous pics show. 

My plants are from the NARGS seed ex with seed collected in 2007.  Every single seed germinated.  They were winter sowed on February 3rd and left outside here in Minnesota.  Most emerged April 18-25.  Seedlings are curious things, as they produce only one leaf the entire first season, that is very different from the mature leaf form.

You can see in a previous pic here: http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=252.0;attach=4043;i... first year seedlings of Syneilesis intermedia in the lower left quadrant.  S. aconitifolia seedlings look exactly the same.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Howey
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-05-17

Rick - if you are able to get such results from sowing seed outside in "winter" in your zone 4a, then it should work for my zone 5b too.  Can hardly wait to try it that way.  Guess the only way Syneilesis resembles Podophyllum peltatum is the way it emerges from the ground and then the umbrella leaves.  Will check to see if they are the same family.  Fran

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Fran, rest assured that it, "winter sowing", (which seems to be the name currently applied to an age-old method, as though it's something new  ;)) works in much colder zones than yours.  The only real difference from "random" seed germination in nature is that one would usually control things somewhat by planting the seeds up in a pot, which may or may not be kept covered.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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