Terrestrial Orchids

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

cohan wrote:

Sadly, the one wild Calypso near my acreage- just a few tens of metres away on the farm- seems to have disappeared since last year :( I'll keep watching the spot, but no sign of the usual overwintering leaves, and no spring bud :(

Maybe it is still early, Cohan?  I was out looking and looking for my little yellow lady's slipper and finally found it... it's just some fuzzy little nubs sticking out the ground about 1 cm at this stage, and I imagine it's a little more advanced here than there.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Cockcroft
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-27

The first of the dactylorhizas are blooming -- hybrids -- D. fuchsii crossed with something, I assume.  Regardless of the parentage, they are a delight to see.

Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington Zone 7-8

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

And really nice markings on those, too, Claire.

Much more showy than most, I'd say. :)

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

A delight indeed!  They are fantastic, Claire!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Claire

lovely to see most of mine are at an early leaf stage and will not flower until mid June.

here is Dactylorhiza sambucina yellow form in flower with me now. I saw hundreds of these last week in Greece.

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

That's a lovely plant Tony. :o Is it a difficult one ? Love the 'Vanilla  Ice Cream' colour.

We've recently made up a 'Terrestrial Orchid bed', especially for the easier grown of this group. This one should be in there  one day, so long as its not too tricky??

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Don't think D. sambucina is difficult. It's a native of Norway and although rare it is abundant where it is found. I do see it in the road verges where I drive every spring. It flowers in May here. They seems to like the mulch of sand they get every winter from the road! In Sweden they have the red form too but in Norway we have only the yellow form.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

It looks as though it should be easy to grow - it is a pig of a thing and never grows well with me. I think it needs very cool conditions with plenty of light which I cannot provide

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

I'll probably give it a miss then, thanks Tony. As I'm new to these orchids I only want to try the easiest of easy ones to begin with. So far that means Epipactis gigantea and Dactylorhiza fuchsii. A good friend has some Anacamptis pyramidalis waiting for me to pick up also. ;D

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Claire, your Dactylorhizas are magnificent, both for the variable leaf mottling (wow), but also for the variable flower markings; genetics running amock!  In the second photo of your D. fuchsii hybrids, the markings on each flower mimics Edvard Munch's ghostly "the scream".

Tony, the vanilla icecream color D. sambucina is delightful. I'm going to have to expand my horizons and start growing more hardy orchids.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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