Terrestrial Orchids

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Cockcroft
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-27

Sources?  I started with 3 plants of D. fuchsii, 1 plant of D. maculata, and 1 plant of D. majalis, all gifts from gardening friends.  Since then, I've actively propagated each species and the bees have cross-pollinated things for me, so seedlings that arise in the garden can have a little of everything mixed in.  I've wholesaled many, many extra plants to nurserymen here in the Pacific Northwest and they've brought in plants from their own sources as well.  Far Reaches Farm in Port Townsend, WA, Keeping It Green in Stanwood, WA, and Edelweiss in OR have all offered dactylorhizas.  (Rick Lupp at Mt. Tahoma has had them for sale.)  Since it can be slow to build up stock, they often sell out pretty rapidly.

All of these plants have proven reliably hardy in my gardening zone, zone 7 or 8 depending on the winter.  Others in colder areas, like Rick Lupp near Mt. Rainier and friends down in Hillsboro, OR, have also overwintered dactylorhizas with no problems.

If anyone wants to trade plants, I'm open to that, especially if you will take a hybrid rather than a species.  Keeping a true line of species is difficult when they seed so readily.  I usually divide and replant bigger clumps at the end of summer when the stalks start to die -- August or September.

Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington Zone 7-8

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Thanks Claire, I may have to give dactylorhizas a try some time, they certainly seem to be rewarding plants.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

They are beautiful, Claire! Better than those I encounter in the wild here ;)

Mark, both fuchsii and maculata is very hardy species here, growing also in winter cold places. Majalis a little less, I presume.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

One of the few orchids we have in the garden, ( although I am adding more this year ), Dactylorhiza fuchsii. Not such a nice form as the ones shown by Claire earlier ( excellent plants ), but its a good representation of the commoner form of the species. I am fairly sure there is no other species mixed in, but with all Dactylorhiza it is very hard to be absolutely certain :)

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

A couple of weeks ago I visited, with a very good friend ( who is a superb plantsman ) an area of grassland and ponds, where we knew various species of terrestrial orchids grew. The season here is a little late and we were a little early. Not very much in evidence on the day we visited. 

My friend revisited the site today and this is some of what he saw. Needless to say, I'll be there ASAP!!

many Dactylorhiza
Platanthera chlorantha
Rather large Dactylorhiza
Anacamptis pyramidalis
D, incarnata and D. purpurella

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Splendid! Personally not being a very knowledgeable orchid guy, I assume most of these are Dactylorhiza, what is the white one in the second photo?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

WOW!  Stunning Dactylorhiza photos, both in the garden and in the wild!   Thank you for posting, Claire and Longma!

Here's a solitary clump of Cypripedium parviflora along the ravine bike path heading into the river valley that I first noticed last spring... a gem among the weeds!

  

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark McD wrote:

Splendid! Personally not being a very knowledgeable orchid guy, I assume most of these are Dactylorhiza, what is the white one in the second photo?

 

Platanthera chlorantha. Place your cursor at the picture!

Very nice, indeed!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Indeed, it is Platanthera chlorantha. Interestingly we saw them on the earlier trip, but this time growing in ancient woodland, deep in shade. As the shafts of light penetrated the canopy and moved around, they highlighted the flowers, making them appear 'ghostly', floating above the gloomy woodland floor.

Platanthera chlorantha in deep shade
Platanthera chlorantha  in heavy shade in ancient woodland

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Longma, have you ever tried spotting Platanthera orchids during the night with the help of your nose? It is a remarkable experience!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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