Escobaria vivipara- complex

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Tart as you would experience eating a Granny Smith apple or sour grape.
The missouriensis had more fibrous tissue and not as much viscous gel, but I wouldn't call it mealy.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

What kind of animal usually eat the berries and disperse the seed?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Hoy wrote:

What kind of animal usually eat the berries and disperse the seed?

That's a good question.  I've never seen any berries plucked out in the wild or at my home.  I suspect they aren't consumed until the body of the cactus has shrunk for winter, and better exposes the berries for easier harvest.  In my photo above, the cactus has already begun to shrink considerably.  I have seen many wild specimens in Minnesota as late as the end of September, when the berries have been ripe with a reddish blush for at least a few weeks and none have been removed.  But I haven't seen them in the wild after the cactus have shrunk down to really know what happens then.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

I would say packrat.

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

Andy71
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-26

Rick, do you still have vivipara seeds from the MN/SD border? I'd like to try it.

Connecticut - zone 6 (humid) - 54" of rain/year

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I do, Andy.  Seed from plants grown from seed from the MN/SD border (ex MN/SD border).  Click on my name, and PM me with your address and I will send you some.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Escobaria vivipara in the wild, in Minnesota near the South Dakota border. This one grows at the edge exceedingly slow growing moss over granite with lichens.  Apparently there are good pollinators there, but 150 miles east where I live, I need to hand pollinate mine to get good seed set.

       

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

What a nice find! Looks like it put on quite a show this spring! You'll have to go on a seed collecting trip later, I hope you GPSed it's location.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

RickR wrote:

Escobaria vivipara in the wild, in Minnesota near the South Dakota border. This one grows at the edge exceedingly slow growing moss over granite with lichens.  Apparently there are good pollinators there, but 150 miles east where I live, I need to hand pollinate mine to get good seed set.

Good find! Seems really tiny? I wish Escobaria habitat in Alberta was closer, but its a good several hours drive just to get to the start of it, and I only found one plant last time I searched, prob need another hour driving to find more...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

It is about two inches (5cm) high.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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