Escobaria vivipara- complex

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04
Escobaria vivipara- complex

Cold hardy, moisture tolerant, low growing form, beautiful flowers,adaptable- -Five key phrases to look for, when choosing a cactus to fit into your rockgarden.
Escobaria vivipara is one of these cactus. It is found in seventeen U.S. states and three Canadian Provence's. With such a vast territory variability is to be expected. Again E viviaria does not let us down. The E. vivipara complex contains nine named varieties and one closely associated species.
The varieties are: arizonica, bisbeeana, deserti, kaibabensis, neomexicana, radiosa, rosa, vivipara (the most wide spread) and buoflama(the name is an acronym of Bureau of Land Management). The associated species is Escobaria alversonii at one point considered a variety.
The highest degree of variability occurs in the south western states. As you will see from my shots var. vivipara is a low clumping mat and arizonica a cylindrical upright clumper. The other varieties fall in between these two forms.

I grow six of the varieties in my zone 7 garden. They have all proved to be perfectly happy and health. In my previous zone 4 garden I grew var. vivipara for twenty years and never had winter kill or any sign of rot. I still grow this same cactus plant.
First is var. vivpara
Second var. rosea
Third var. neomexicana
Fourth var. buoflama
Fifth var. bisbeeana
Sixth var. arizonica

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

It is a pleasure to view such fine plants!
Maybe some of these could take my winters too?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Hoy
Look for Escobaria vivipara var. vivipara. It is the hardyest and most moisture tolerant. This is the variety that can be found in the southern prairies of Canada.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Thanks, I'll do that!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I will send you some seed, Trond.  Mine are from the Minnesota/South Dakota border - the easternmost colony of variety vivipara known, I think.  And therefore the most rain tolerant, one would expect.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I am pleased, thank you!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Balistrieri
Balistrieri's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-11-04

I love these little hardy guys. During my move, I built a small hardy cactus bed. Mostly opuntias at this time, a major goal is to include smaller and barrel cacti.

Carlo A. Balistrieri
Flemington, NJ (smack dab between New York City and Philadelphia)
Zone 6

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Welcome to the forum, Carlo!  Nice web site.  Would you (or anyone else) like some seed too?  I still have plenty.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Jeremy
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-10-01

Rick and All,
My Coryphantha (as I call them) vivipara seedling/grubs aren't doing much of anything. After enthusiastically wiggling up out of the dirt all green and then getting whiskers, they turned a reddish color and just sit there. They get about 2 hours direct sun, 4 hours filtered, and the rest high shade and plenty of moisture. Should I be feeding them? I gave them a dilute slosh of Miracle-Gro. What do they want of me?  J

Jeremy
Uxbridge, MA US Zone 6a
Consider that you might be wrong.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

The reddish color, as you might expect, is a reaction to high light and/or austere conditions.  As long as they are still plump and not shriveling, there is not a real problem, but perhaps they would grow faster if they received a little less direct sun.  When I grew my seedlings, there were to the north side of the house, a little away from the building, where the received late evening sun.  I don't think I ever fed them.  How is the water you are applying?  Is it high pH tap water that went through the water softener?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Jeremy
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-10-01

So the little tykes are sunburnt! They have been relocated. Thanks!
They're getting well water, untreated, pH unknown. I could water them with rain water, but it's likely to be pretty acidic here in Mass.

Jeremy
Uxbridge, MA US Zone 6a
Consider that you might be wrong.

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