Woodland Corydalis

32 posts / 0 new
Last post
Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

A corydalis with ornamental seedpods is a first for me!
  Very attractive, Mark, as are all your corydalis.  :o

Is C. malkensis a tuberous type?  And it looks like angustifolius is, too.

Yes, both are tuberous, they'll die down shortly after flowering just like C. solida.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

ErnieC123
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-02

I have only two ugly pictures of the Corydalis


And one of my Corydalis lutea with some seedlings around it

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Dicentra cucullaria, in the wild not far from my house.  I have "decided" this is another species that can sit "dormant" for multiple years without showing above ground.  I know this area quite well, and this spring I am seeing at least four times as many plants as I have ever seen there before.  Plants are larger than ever before, too, with flower scapes up to 6 inches(!)

Possible reasons:
--- the ridiculously warmer than normal winter
--- the exceptionally dry late summer through winter
--- perfectly timed rainfall last spring during the Dutchman's Breeches' growth cycle

It's weird that our dry spring has not seemed to affect the plants...

       

       

A pinkish form:

               

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Ernie, do you know what the "blue" one in the first picture is?

Rick, those Dicentras were excellent!
But if they have rested several years before flowering it isn't strange they look good ;)
The dry spring do not affect this flowering but the next one - they relay on stored energy.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

ErnieC123
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-02

Hoy wrote:

Ernie, do you know what the "blue" one in the first picture is?

Rick, those Dicentras were excellent!
But if they have rested several years before flowering it isn't strange they look good ;)
The dry spring do not affect this flowering but the next one - they relay on stored energy.

Hoy , i am sorry. I don't know what cultivars those 2 Corydalis are. I only know that they are Corydalis solida cultivars.
They both don't get bigger because my  two dogs dig them out last autumn.

To Rick and the others: I am sorry , because some plants i like , are very normal to you. Here in Germany Dic.cucullaria isn't found as often in nurseries as in your areas.

Maybe there are some plants that you are more interessted in , in my garden. Maybe some of the Polygonatum are new to you!
Do you have special interessts where i can help you?

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Rick, always good to see plants like Dicentra cuccularia growing in the wild, to observe the variability in both flower and leaves.  I'm noticing that the degree of leaf dissection can vary a lot; I'll post some photos in another topic showing my plants, which have what i call "extreme leaf dissection", with overlapping leaflets.

Ernie, I have long since given up trying to keep cultivar names on abundantly self-seeding plants like Corydalis solida.  Instead, I prefer to just allow them to self sow far and wide, and enjoy the rich range of color forms that appear, for me, they don't need names, I love them all.

With the cold to cool, dry, sunny weather, these spring ephemerals are hanging around in fine flower for an exceptionally long time. Here's a sampling of Corydalis solida color forms.

Left:  a good red color.  Once you have some good red ones, they'll seed around and give lots of strong red forms.
Right: a young plant, probably 2nd year from seed, a really bright coral red.

Left:  closeup of the 2-year coral red self-sown plant.
Right: another closeup of the 2-year coral red self-sown plant, having fun with my wife's new digital camera.

Left:  pink and purple
Right: my darkest purple form

Left:  received small bulbs from a European correspondant of selected blue colors of the Penza strain. I ended up getting a pure white, a purple, and this single light blue; I'm very happy to introduce white and blue into the C. solida color palette.  Photo in shade.
Right: same plant, photo taken in sun.

Left:  same red-flowered form seen in the first photo, but a broader garden view.
Right: a different red form, sort of a purplish crushed raspberry red color.  Delicious.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Great display, Mark!  I seem to have lost my single red one last year, though I have a couple of 'George Baker' (red) and 'Beth Evans' (pink), purchased last year, to look forward to.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

ErnieC123
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-02

McDonough, your Corydalis have great colours and look very vital. I agree that its hard to get a clean labeled collection of Corydalis.
Please tell me how large your garden is. It seems to me that you have tons of plants in it. I feel a little jealous  ;)

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

ErnieC123 wrote:

It seems to me that you [Mark M.] have tons of plants in it. I feel a little jealous  ;)

I feel a LOT jealous.  ;D

Ernie, I have lots of normal plants, too.  But what may seem common to some, are not common for others.  My comment on the other topic that "such little sprigs of growth brings joy" is a compliment!  We all experience these wonders of nature. ;D

-------------------------------------
I just realized I put Dicentra in the Corydalis thread! :-\
I am going to repost the entry to the Miscellaneous Woodlanders thread, where it belongs.  Sorry about that.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

ErnieC123 wrote:

McDonough, your Corydalis have great colours and look very vital. I agree that its hard to get a clean labeled collection of Corydalis.
Please tell me how large your garden is. It seems to me that you have tons of plants in it. I feel a little jealous  ;)

Yes, the Corydalis seem to like it here, and they seed around all over the place.  I love the red ones, but when you have them of certain colors, they seed around and expand those colors through the garden.  My red ones started with 'George Baker', but I can no longer be certain of having that named cultivar, what I have are 2nd, 3rd, 4th generation seedlings.  In other words, the cultivar names no longer matter.

Garden space versus land, are two different things.  I have 1.75 acres (the town I live in has 2-acre minimum property lots, smaller lots are "grand fathered", which means smaller lots are allowed by exception).  About 1 acre is useable, the rest of my property is a steep wooded area well beyond the reach of a water hose, so I don't bother.

Rick, I'll look for the continuation of Dicentra talk on the Miscellaneous Woodlanders thread  :)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Pages

Log in or register to post comments