Woodland Corydalis

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harold peachey
harold peachey's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-22

Mark, the C. ellipticarpa came from Ellen Hornig last year.  Unfortunately she is no longer in the retail nursery business.  Still evaluating characteristics of this species, I will endeavor to keep you informed, meanwhile I will try to collect some seed.

Harold Peachey
USDA Z5, Onondaga, NY US

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

C. ellipticarpa certainly is a species I have to add to my collection!
Here is a new one flowering those days, C. buschii. This species can spread a little but I will tolerate that!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Corydalis cheilantifolia starting to bloom.  Now that I have finally gotten plants to stay alive in the garden, they seem to be "taking over"!  :-\

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

Corydalis cheilantifolia starting to bloom.  Now that I have finally gotten plants to stay alive in the garden, they seem to be "taking over"!  :-\

Rick, a pity if it should become a pest! It is a stately plant.
My plant hasn't shown any tendency to spread. When I think of it I haven't seen it at all this spring! :-\

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Nice one, Rick, the leaves really do look like ferns :)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

ErnieC123
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-02

RickR wrote:

Corydalis cheilantifolia starting to bloom.  Now that I have finally gotten plants to stay alive in the garden, they seem to be "taking over"!  :-\

You are right Rick, C.cheilanthifolia can spread heavy. And they can live nearly in every little cleavage. But it is such a beauty and can be pulled out very easy , so let i grow.

I have two Corydalis where i have lost the label. I try to send pictures tomorrow, maybe somebody can help !

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I've found that they do seed around a bit but never to pest proportions in my yard.  Some years, I have to hunt around to find a few plants, and other years, there will be little accumulations of them.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

With prolonged cool weather, the various Corydalis can stay in flower for many weeks.  One that has been an exceptionally slow grower is C. marschalliana, a beautiful small upright soft yellow species.  It flowers reliably each year, looking bigger and better this year than in the past. But it has never set seed, so I risk losing it; it doesn't share the propensity of seedling around like C. solida and the white C. malkensis.

Corydalis marschalliana

About 5-6 years ago, I acquired a plant of C. malkensis.  It is now seeding around quite a bit, which I'm happy about.  In this photo, is my original plant, been looking this lovely for weeks.

Also about 5 years ago, I received seed of C. angustifolia.  I sowed the seed directly in the garden, and it germinated readily as do many Corydalis do.  It is a small species, with small unassuming white flowers with a hint of blue, this year finally producing enough flowers to actually be noticed.  Then I noticed that the plant is laden with seed pods this year, looking like red pea pods hanging from the decumbent stems, cool! :o

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

A corydalis with ornamental seedpods is a first for me!
  Very attractive, Mark, as are all your corydalis.  :o

Is C. malkensis a tuberous type?  And it looks like angustifolius is, too.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Yes, you can certainly grow the angustifolia as an seedpod ornamental! I haven't tried it yet but I will!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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