North American Columbines - starting with Aquilegia saximontana

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I'm curious about this too.  My large aquilegia in the border don't go dormant either.  I bought a potful of A. jonesii seedlings from Beaver Creek this spring, and they are still green in the tufa bed.  I also bought an unnamed alpine aquilegia from a local alpine gardener, which did either die or go dormant in early summer... I wonder which it was?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Mmmmmm. Since the Aquilegia hybrids I have in my garden eventually loose their remaining leaves when the weather turns colder I'd assumed that all Aquilegias did the same. When you use the term "before the season closes" Rick, when does this happen please?

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I think both Rick and I thought you were referring to them going dormant during the summer, prior to the onset of killing frost...

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Sorry to cause confusion. I was trying to clarify whether my seedlings would go dormant naturally at the appropriate time of the year or being seedlings would they prefer to be kept in growth (in which case I would have to find alternative accommodation for them other than a cold greenhouse).

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Lori S. wrote:

I think both Rick and I thought you were referring to them going dormant during the summer, prior to the onset of killing frost...

That's exactly what I was thinking.

But I think I get it now, David.  You're right that seedlings often react differently than mature plants.  Of course, one can never go wrong by mimicking the natural environment, but whether or not altering it would be beneficial, I don't know.  I think it is pretty common for seedlings to seem to not take on winter dormancy characteristics that we expect, yet they are ready for the change.  For instance, a seedling that seems to be evergreen, when other mature plants of the same species have shed their leaves.

 

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

This was grown from Exchange seed supplied as Aqilegia saximontana and now flowering for the first time. Is it correct please?

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Well, it looks pretty darn convincing to me (which is to say, at least superficially*).  I noticed that you also posted it at SRGC, so perhaps Bob Nold will weigh in on its identity.

 

*Meaning that I don't really have a clue... just that there is a general resemblance. 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Thanks for replying Lori. General feeling on SRGC is that my plant is Aquilegia flabellata.

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Sorry, been on a week long deadline, so missing the posts.  David, I cannot say what your Aquilegia is without seeing the spurs, the spurs on saximontana are rather unique.  Can you show us a photo from a side view or overhead-oblique perspecitive.  I will go look on SRGC too.  Most falbellata types jump out as flabellata types, this one does not jump out like that.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Here's a description and drawing that might be helpful:

http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=233500115

 

Edit:  But missing the obvious... Mark made several excellent posts in the first 3 pages of this thread that discuss and show the characteristics of A. saximontana! 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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