Crocus 2013

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Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Longma wrote:

C. cancellatus is a real subtle beauty Tony. Is it one that may do well in the garden for me, given that I'm sure C. mathewii will do well here ? You do grow some wonderful Crocus sp. Are the majority from seed?

Ron

 

As the cancellatus was growing with the mathewii I would expect them to grow in the same conditions in the garden. I find them very challenging here even in a glass house due to our humidity and lack of heat in the summer.

Yes most of mine are grown from seed collected by me  although a number come from swaps if they come from places I cannot get to.

 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Lori S. wrote:

Nothing so special here as those already shown... but Crocus speciosus is all I got! smiley

Very nice, still. I find all the fall Crocus much nicer than the Colchicums..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

A flowerless trip to Greece last week with just a few Crocus robertianus in flower on the last day when it rained. Hot and dry and the rain a month late made it look like a desert.

  

Another pictureless post even though I seem to have pressed every box!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Tony Willis wrote:

A flowerless trip to Greece last week with just a few Crocus robertianus in flower on the last day when it rained. Hot and dry and the rain a month late made it look like a desert.

Another pictureless post even though I seem to have pressed every box!

Tony, there are FAQ posts here, describing two methods on how to post photos on the forum:
https://www.nargs.org/forums/announcements-moderators-and-administrators

You're almost there, after you upload a photo, a new INSERT button appears to the right of the uploaded photo thumbnail.  To actually place your uploaded photos into your message, place you cursor into the text message where you want a photo to appear, that use the INSERT button next to uploaded image thumbnail to "paste" it into your message.  You had two images uploaded, I went ahead and finished the operation for each uploaded image, hitting INSERT for each.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tingley
Title: Member
Joined: 2013-01-07

Mark McD wrote:

 

Longma wrote:

Beautifully grown C. sativus Mark. You seem to have a clump going there? Any growing tips please? It's definitely one that I'm going to try again in the garden next year, cool

 

From what I have read, C. sativus grows well in climates with sufficient summer heat and dryness.  I planted a number of bulbs from a "big box store" about 8 years ago, and it has flowered well, and increased each year since.  The corms are planted at the base of a white single-flowered form of deep-rooted Hibiscus syriacus, where I have lots of bulbs planted.  Maybe I just got lucky where I planted it, but it's been the best autumn-blooming crocus by far; wish I could give you more scientific advice.  Here's a photo from last year, on the same exact date (10/19/2012).

 

Mark, how long did it take the C. sativus to bloom after planting? I put some in late last year, and they survived. multiplied, but have yet to show any signs of blooming. They are in almost full sun, in well drained gravelly soil amended with some well rotted manure. Hopefully they'll show some color for us here next fall!

Southwest Nova Scotia, zone 6b or thereabouts

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Gordon, I planted the corms in the autumn, and they flowered the following year.  They have continued to bloom year after year, although this year bloom was more modest and short-lived, I think because last year all the late autumn foliage (which is very dense, looks like turf grass) was eaten to the ground by rabbits and that may have weakened the corms.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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