Crocus 2013

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Crocus mathewii is such a stunning species, must try it again.  My C. speciosus come up with fresh buds over a two week period, but each and every flower is either decapitated or totally eaten, just stubs left; still haven't discovered which varmint is doing this.  Last year they hit up about half the flowers on C. sativus, this year they've left it alone so far, but I haven't checked today.

Saffron Crocus, C. sativus:

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Beautifully grown C. sativus Mark. You seem to have a clump going there? Any growing tips please? It's definitely one that I'm going to try again in the garden next year, cool

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Ron very nice,I do not think I could dare put mine outside.

 

here are two flowering today

Crocus laevigatus

Crocus cancellatus growing with the C. mathewii I showed before.

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Very pretty and nice time of year for flowers- I still haven't tried any fall bulbs...

As for changes in focus and space- I think it's probably good we don't have unlimited growing space- we'd then need unlimited time to look after the plants..lol

Tony- you have some real beauties- matthewii is exceptional!

Mark and Ron- more lovelies...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Nothing so special here as those already shown... but Crocus speciosus is all I got! smiley

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Longma wrote:

Beautifully grown C. sativus Mark. You seem to have a clump going there? Any growing tips please? It's definitely one that I'm going to try again in the garden next year, cool

 

From what I have read, C. sativus grows well in climates with sufficient summer heat and dryness.  I planted a number of bulbs from a "big box store" about 8 years ago, and it has flowered well, and increased each year since.  The corms are planted at the base of a white single-flowered form of deep-rooted Hibiscus syriacus, where I have lots of bulbs planted.  Maybe I just got lucky where I planted it, but it's been the best autumn-blooming crocus by far; wish I could give you more scientific advice.  Here's a photo from last year, on the same exact date (10/19/2012).

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Oooooh, these are all so nice!

 

Mark, I would think that you would have to keep that hibiscus water all summer, making it not very adaptable for the Crocus.  But obviously not!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

C. cancellatus is a real subtle beauty Tony. Is it one that may do well in the garden for me, given that I'm sure C. mathewii will do well here ? You do grow some wonderful Crocus sp. Are the majority from seed?

Lori - I love your C. speciosus, ..... it is a great plant for most gardens, yes

WOW surprise Mark,  there's a few $$$$ worth of saffron there, smiley.  Great growing !! I'm thinking I may need to use a sand / grit bed to grow it well here, even though we get little rain in summer.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

[quote=Longma

 

 

                                                           the first of what I hope will be six or seven seed raised C. mathewii, growing outdoors but in a pot. I will certainly be putting this species into the garden next year as it seems very tolerant and hardy ( here smiley).

                                                        

[/quote]

 

Any idea how long it took to flower from seed Ron ?.

Lovely Crocus pics by the way folks.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

These are in their fourth year Dave. Looking at the pot today I expect one more to flower soon, although the recent weather is very wet and really dull. I don't grow many Crocus from seed so don't know if this is normal or not. I have a few other pots of 'seedlings' of various species which have been equally easy to grow and should flower in Spring if four to five years is normal. My seed has always been freshly given, not sure if this is relevant or not with Crocus. Other forum members grow many more types of these from seed, including some real rarities, so maybe their experience is a better guideline than mine.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

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