Schaefer Prairie - Minnesota

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Toole
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Joined: 2010-07-02

Wonderful images Rick.

I remember growing one of the Monarda sps at one stage --a lot of colour and a bee magnet yes  however i found it just a bit too vigorous so out it went. sad.

I currently have small plants of Allium stellatum I raised from seed last year.It will be interesting to see if i end up with any colour variations as shown in your previous postings.

Cheers Dave.

PS Just gone back into edit my post after checking that the emotions thingy works ........Yippee !!,---(I'll add another one ..Hehe !).smiley

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19

Really enjoying this thread Rick and your wonderful images, cool.

I'm certainly not 'au fait' with many of the plants that you are showing, but hope that one day part of our garden will take on the feel of the areas you are showing us. Inspirational. yes

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

I have a wish (among many) before I die - to walk in a real prairie!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Great bunch of plants, as Lori mentioned, worth a longer slower look. I'm always interested in prairie species, since they are mostly outside my area. The Pedicularis foliage is interesting, so unlike the ferny foliage on local sp.  Lithospermum looks very choice indeed! I suppose many of these species are things that Prairie Moon would carry seed of..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

cohan wrote:

 I suppose many of these species are things that Prairie Moon would carry seed of..

 

Yes.  Although Prairie Moon is Minnesota based, their sales volume has dictated that all their seed sources are not always local anymore.  Still one of the better seed prairie seed companies, in my opinion.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
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I have not ordered from them yet, but their site comes up occasionally re: species I'm looking into, and they do list some very interesting and not commonly offered species.

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

A few more pics in the prairie from a late summer visit:

Gentiana andrewsii

          

 

Liatris ligulistylis - flower, upper foliage, foliage one-quarter the way up from the base.

                   

 

Colias sp. (Sulphur butterfly) on L. ligulistylis.   Liatris pychnostachys

                                        

 

Anyone know what kind of day flying moth? this is? 

                   

 

Lots of different insects, most of which I don't know....

Colias sp. again, Chauliognathus pennsylvanicus (Soldier beetle) and ? on an aster.

               

 

Ripe Thalictrum dasycarpum achenes. The species' foliage becomes even more glabrous as the season progresses.  Allium stellatum.

                   

 

Amorpha canescens in seed.  Polygonum amphibianum var. emersum is a species I would have thought would have loved all the extra rainfall this year.  But it hardly even bloomed!

                   

                                  

 

The only Vernonia fasiculata  that I found still blooming.

                   

 

Several species of Helianthus grow here,  don't know which is which, though.  This one in the first pic rings a wet area where sedges, Cord grass (Spartina pectinata), Water smartweed, Lobelia syphilitica and Scutellaria galericulata grow.  The reddish brown on the higher land in the background is Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii).  The stem coloring is more pronounced in the late season.  It looks like a monoculture, but to assume that would be a huge mistake.  And though not as colorful, Indian grass (Sorghastrum nutans) abounds also with similar hues.                             

                                     

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Longma
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The butterfly is Colias eurytheme and the  day flying moth is Autographa precationis

Can't see enough to ID the small black beetle on the Aster or the green beetle at top left of the third A. precationislaugh

 

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Thanks so much for the IDs, Ron.  I am so new to insect identification.  I didn't remember seeing the black on the upper side of the wings of the Sulphur when it flew, so I wasn't going to commit.  But that is what I thought it was, too. 

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19

RickR wrote:

Thanks so much for the IDs, Ron.  I am so new to insect identification. 

 

Anytime Rick, smiley.

Great call on the Chauliognathus pensylvanicus by the way. Definitely a friend to gardeners.

http://ninnescahlife.wichita.edu/node/409

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

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