Schaefer Prairie - Minnesota

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

The only flower I found still blooming of our native Beebalm (Monarda fistulosa).  Not as full as usual, but shows the true light lavender color that I find more pleasing than the bright colors of the garden cultivars of M. didyma.  Most plants at this time of year look like the second pic, a little tired and lots of seed heads.
         

Pedicularis lanceolata (Swamp betony) is an interesting plant.  The flowers tilt to one side and give a spiraling effect to the floral spike when viewed from above, even though the flowers point straight out from the stem.
       

       

Silver Scurf pea (Pediomelum argophyllum) is way past bloom (see flowers here: http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=455.msg18808#msg18808), but the leaves, heavily clothed with white hairs, make it a pleasant sight.  A few Phlox pillosa var. fulgida (Downy phlox) still blooming.
       

Rosa arkansana (Prairie rose) is always an unassuming plant in the prairie, an so is a joy to come across.  The silver-gray Amorpha canescens (Leadplant) is also past bloom, but remains an integral part of prairie views.
       

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

This should be Pycnanthemum virginianum (Virginia Mountain mint), although I detect no mint odor at all.  But the characteristics fit more with it than P. tenuifolium.  
       

Prairie Cordgrass (Spartina pectinata) can grow almost as a monoculture, and in such a case can be a little dangerous to walk through since he leaves have sharp edges.  But here it is quite benign.  Big Bluestem is in the foreground of the second photo.
       

Scutellaria galericulata (Marsh skullcap) grows in the very wet parts with tufted sedges.
       

Several goldenrods grow here.  These are the easy ones to identify, as the foliage is quite different from most goldenrods.
Stiff goldenrod (Solidago rigida) - second pic non-flowering stage, and the swamp loving Riddell's goldenrod (Solidago riddellii).  Both are just beginning to bloom.
              

           

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

More great plants! Interesting to see which plants are similar to here, and which very different... I like the Pedicularis, simply because my only  local species (that I've seen, at least) is pink..
So, several Liatris species all grow in close proximity? Interesting.. none in my immediate area, though I guess we have that situation with numerous Asters...
Goldenrods are mostly done here, at the least past their prime-- but of course we are much nearer to frost (any day, potentially) than you are, so while things continue to flower past frost, very few species trust all their seed potential to late good weather!

Interested in seeing your last post, which oddly shows in the summary when I'm replying, but did not come out properly and does not show in the thread apart from the first line...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Yes, the different Liatris species grow amongst each other, although there seems to be some preference for moist to dry. None grow in the wet parts, of course,  but L. pychnostachya grows in the more moist areas, then L. ligulistylis, then L. aspera, and L. punctata in the driest part.

I think you were reading my last post while I was in the midst of building it.  At the most, I can post seven pics at a time, so I have to go back and add the rest via the modification button.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

These Polygonum amphibium var. emersum (Swamp smartweed) have nice undulating leaves.  In the second pic, the seed heads of Vernonia fasciculata (Prairie ironweed) are in the foreground and background.  The ironweeds do seem to like a lot of moisture, despite their strong root systems.
       

       

And one more prairie scene to end the album.

                       

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

The Vernonia are interesting.. Panayoti was just talking about the genus a bit on FB and his blog.. another genus I have not seen in person..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

fleurbleue
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Wonderful to be allowed to discover your wild flora ! Many thanks Rick  ;)

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Rick, beautiful - and in no way similar to neither moonscape nor marsscape ;)
The Canada thistle isn't restricted to Canada! It is a bad native weed here too! But the purple loosestrife is not although it is native too ;)

Lots of interesting plants, in fact they all are ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Hoy wrote:

The Canada thistle isn't restricted to Canada! It is a bad native weed here too!

Heck, it isn't even from Canada - we are getting a bad rap here!  ;)  It's an introduced European weed.... (so why is it called "Canada" thistle??)

Yes, very interesting plants.  I'm puzzled by Liatris too... have some blooming in the front yard and may have to post them here for IDs!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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