Colchicum 2013

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

It's funny how one can be in blissful ignorance of a plant, and then once made aware of an unfamiliar plant, it crops up here, there, and everywhere. So, now that I'm tuned in on Colchicum psaridis, I keep running across the name :D

Was checking out SRGC Forum, and there in a topic on the Kackar Mountains of northeastern Turkey (bordering the Black Sea), Moderator Maggi posted a series of links.
http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=10111.msg267743;topicseen#new

One link in particular was to a SRGC Journal from 1995, and there Colchicum psaridis is discussed (page 257) and there is a good botanical painting (page 270).
http://files.srgc.net/journals/vol_1%20to_113/96.pdf

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Autumn here (officially!) and this Colchicum is doing its best to live up to its name (in Oz they tend to call Colchicums "autumn crocus"!!! :o )
I think I received it as C. atropurpureum but I think it's a form of C. cilicium - the flower gets darker as it ages.

cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Fermi, I seemed to have missed you post, lovely Colchicum of deep color.  They call them "autumn crocus" here too.

At the start of March, Colchicum kesselringii was budded, but it was too cold for blooms to open. Then over the past two weeks we had just under 3' of snow (34" or 85 cm to be exact) in two major snowstorms. On the warm south side of house where these are planted, the snow has been melting quickly and receded enough today for flowers to open well.  Nearby a second grouping with much larger flowers has been squashed, the flowers ruined from the snow load, but I'm happy to see this little colony blooming well.

Snow on my deck from the snowstorm last week, the dining table becomes a snow donut, a good gauge of snow depth. Taken last Tuesday, March 19th, it continued to snow all day, totally 16" (40 cm).

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Nice to see your colony, Mark!
But that snow...Brrrrrrrr!
We've been waiting for the autumn break - thought it had arrived last weekend and today we were hit by 34oC and fires breaking out all over the State!
Here's another autumn one - Colchicum cilicium
cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Good one Fermi. I think I need to expand my Colchicum palette to include more of the autumn ones. Does the spring/summer foliage on C. cilicicum get very leafy and large; the fact some do have large foliage influenced my selection, preferring the smaller Colchicum species.

Today (Easter Sunday) it was sunny and warm, and the bulbs are starting to pop into bloom, including Colchicum doerfleri (with either two forms, or perhaps two species, both sent to me a number of years ago as C. doerfleri).

And lest we forget about C. kesselringii, here are two more recent views, a full frontal shot :o on the left, where the purple stripes can't be seen as the flowers open widely, and on the right, the flowers closing down late this afternoon, still looking good.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Very nice Colchiums, Mark. I have tried quite a few but most types dislike my climate (or my growing regime) :-\

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Looking very good there Mark. Much nicer to see them in the ground, than trapped in pots ( as mine are ! ). I have a whole new raised bed to plant up this year. Many more of mine are going out into the garden.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

McDonough wrote:

Good one Fermi. I think I need to expand my Colchicum palette to include more of the autumn ones. Does the spring/summer foliage on C. cilicicum get very leafy and large; the fact some do have large foliage influenced my selection, preferring the smaller Colchicum species.

Hi Mark, the foliage isn't excessive but some of the smaller ones like C. corsicum have very tidy foliage and don't threaten anything with being over-shadowed or engulfed!
I do like that C. kesselringii - it's more difficult to source over here! I'll try again from seed.
cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Colchicum x agrippinum (fall blooming) is well behaved.

                        May 2012
         

                        Sept 2011
   

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I like the twisty foliage on C. x agrippinum, and checkered flowers too, definitely one to try.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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