Colchicum 2013

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Longma
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Colchicum 2013

C. kesselringii

The first sunshine here for a couple of weeks has persuaded the first of many ( I hope! ;D ) flowers to open up on these tiny plants.

RickR
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Joined: 2009-09-21

I have always thought that the striping on this species is particularly attractive.

  Yours is no exception.  ;D

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
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Joined: 2009-12-14

Ron, one of the best and most delightful Colchicum species, I have two forms of this species growing outside planted on the warm south-facing sunny side of the house, typically flowering early March, among the very first flowers in the garden. Seems hard to believe these can be in bloom in just 1 month from now, we just had about 24" (60 cm) of snow.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Longma
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That's very encouraging information Mark. I have only just built up enough stock of one clone to try it out in the garden this year. I hope you'll be able to post a pic or two when yours flower?
Do you ever get any seed from your two forms? For years I only had the one clone and was, despite careful paintbrush attention, unable to get any seed. Last year I managed to get a couple more different clones, so am hoping this will prove to be the key to getting seed this year. These newly acquired clones have yet to put in an appearance.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Thus far I'm encouraged by this Colchicum's hardiness and weather resilience to late snow and ice.  Thus far, no seed has been produced.  I did however, finally get seed pods in 2012 on Colchicum doerfleri, after having a couple forms in the garden and flowering each of the last 5 years.  Here are some photos of both species I posted here in 2011 and 2012:

photo of C. kesselringii in the garden, April 2011:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=204.msg7691#msg7691

(scroll down a few messages, I posted photo of C. doerfleri, another very small spring charmer), or see it here:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=204.msg7889#msg7889

One week earlier in March 2011, the same two Colchicum (several posts):
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=204.msg7392#msg7392

and in March 2012 it flowered 3 weeks earlier than in 2011:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=934.msg15723#msg15723

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Longma
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Thanks for these links Mark. I should have used the 'Search' function before I asked the question,  :-[ :-[
Can we 'WOW' that message now? ;D Noted your comment regarding the scent of the flowers. I was unaware of this in this species, but will be checking it out from now on. 8)
I hope that things are returning to normal, as best they can, following another serious weather event for you.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Longma wrote:

I hope that things are returning to normal, as best they can, following another serious weather event for you.

Driveway has been cleared, cars cleaned off, mailbox dug out, today it is cold and sunny without a cloud in the sky, everything back to normal.

By the way Ron, have you grown Colchicum doerfleri?  The small leaves can be covered with fine hair.  I was given some bulbs, they varied somewhat in flower color, size, and leaf pubescence, one has hairs along the leave margins, the other has leaves totally covered with fine hairs. The first shot of plants flowering in 2010 shows two forms. If I get seed this year, I will collect it for anyone interested.

Colchicum doerfleri, March 16, 2010 (very early flowering):

Colchicum doerfleri foliage, April 30, 2010.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Longma
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Good to hear that the storm has passed Mark, and that things can get back to 'normal'.

Have you considered the possibility that the plants with the hairs along the leaf margins are indeed C. doerfleri, whilst the ones with leaves totally covered with fine hairs could be a different species? ( possibly C. psaridis? -  http://photos.v-d-brink.eu/Flora-and-Fauna/Europe/Greece-Southern-Peloponnese/10896942_NFTzvV#!i=760897294&k=k6KgcdT )
I have grown plants like both previously, but have passed them on ( exchanged for some choice Fritillaria sp.! ;D ;D ). They both look very happy in your garden anyway,  8).

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Longma wrote:

Have you considered the possibility that the plants with the hairs along the leaf margins are indeed C. doerfleri, whilst the ones with leaves totally covered with fine hairs could be a different species? ( possibly C. psaridis? -  http://photos.v-d-brink.eu/Flora-and-Fauna/Europe/Greece-Southern-Peloponnese/10896942_NFTzvV#!i=760897294&k=k6KgcdT )
I have grown plants like both previously, but have passed them on ( exchanged for some choice Fritillaria sp.! ;D ;D ). They both look very happy in your garden anyway,  8).

Thanks for the suggestion, I have not heard of Colchicum psaridis, the photo of it in Marijn van den Brink's photo galleries does look just like it. Although I see that C. psaridis is now considered a synonym of C. zahnii.  In the following herbarium links, its not possible to detect pubescence as it doesn't really show up well in dried specimens, but the bulbs certainly look different. If I ever dig these up, I'll be sure to study the underground parts.

C. zahnii (syn. psaridis)
http://apps.kew.org/herbcat/getImage.do?imageBarcode=K000464102

C. doerfleri
http://ww2.bgbm.org/herbarium/view_biocase.cfm?SpecimenPK=18157

The plants in the garden flower at precisely the same time, I do wonder if the level of pubescence is variable. The seed pods looked the same too. I say this after our universal impression of Allium cristophii as having hairs mostly on the margins of the leaves, but there are forms that are heavily pubescent on the entire leaf surface, such as some from Iran.  Last, I'm also aware of the complexity of these spring blooming European and Mediterraneum Colchicum, particularly in the C. cupanii group. And, maybe the few bulbs sent to me, were indeed mixed. Perhaps not an easy answer.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Longma
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McDonough wrote:

Perhaps not an easy answer.

I couldn't agree with you more Mark.  ;D ;D

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Longma
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Regarding 'hairy leaved' Colchicum, this C. serpentinum certainly fits the bill, ( very obvious in third picture ),

http://www.vrvforum.be/forum/index.php?topic=991.msg35575#msg35575

Also, in his newly published 2013 catalogue, Janis Ruksans makes the following comment regarding C. hirsutum, -

"A dwarf colchicum which flowers in late winter or very early in spring with 2.5 cm long,nice mid-pink flowers with contrasting black anthers. Leaves more or less covered with silvery hairs."

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

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