Polygonatum 2012

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

Polygonatum verticillatum(?) and friends.  The individual plant spreads and multiplies, but never gets very tall.  From a potted acquisition, in the four full seasons I have had it, it has not flowered. ???       

No flowers yet but buds on my Polygonatum verticillatum. This is the real, native thing!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

ncole
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

I love that 'Betberg' also...hope I can find one around here. 

I live in Baltimore, Md. zone7 and have a woodland garden....for over 30 years...so I am old.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Bought this Polygonatum at a local NARGS New England Chapter plant auction, labeled as P. mandshuricum, although I can not find any reference to such a species, no names that are even close.  Any one know know what species it might be.  It is described as very low growing and somewhat aggressive spreading.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Schier
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Title: Member
Joined: 2011-02-16

Interesting to see all of these Polygonatum - I have, for one - a P.falcatum 'Variegatum' which I've had for several years, but the poor thing has been moved twice, and worse yet, now in it's permanent place I have managed to step on it just when it's coming up two years in a row. It must be jinxed! Yet, it still manages to come up, and is now well marked. It's always late in coming up, and I don't blame it, it's probably scared.
I also have a Polygonatum biflorum which I wanted for so long, and just last year it started making some headway, it grew to oh, maybe just under a metre.  I'm growing it in a shady woodland area so it does come up late as well.  I'll take some photos when it's up and growing.

Faith S.   Gardening in central Alberta climate, from min. -44 c to max. 36+ C. ( not often! ) Avg. annual precip. ~ 48 cm  Altitude ~ 820 m. Have "frying pan gardens" up around the house, and also some woodland areas down the pa

Afloden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-15

Mark,

That "mandshuricum" is the Chinese mainland form of P. humile. Hard to believe that it is the same as the smaller, more attractive, glossy leaved plant in cultivation. I have been unable to track down where the material in cultivation originated, but it seems the coastal Japanese plant is very unlike the Chinese/Korean plant. Maybe DNA will help.

Aaron

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Polygonatum multiflorum is naturalised in my woodland - the slugs don't like it! Bad pictures but it is very shady underneath the rhododendron canopy.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-08-27

I had this as Polygonatum humile but was told it was too large (at up to about 20 cm), but I see in this thread that it comes in different sizes. Hope someone can confirm or otherwise.

Thanks

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Afloden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-15

Stephen,

Looks like the China mainland form. The Japanense/Korean island's plant is much smaller. Smell the flowers when the open, they should smell like cinnamon.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

The first flowers have opened on a plant which is very similar to P verticillatum. The leaves have another colour though and the plant is much bigger.

The first two are the unknown, the third is verticillatum.

     

I have also a pink one, bought from Larz Danielsson in Sweden as sp from China!

     

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Afloden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-15

Hard to say on the first one, but maybe trinerve if the inside of the flowers are correct. That whole complex needs work though.

The second is likely kansuense. The stems should be scabrous and the veins of the leaves beneath should have smaller little scabers as well at 10x.

Aaron

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