Polygonatum 2012

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ErnieC123
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-02

Afloden wrote:

Falcatum variegatum = odoratum under current taxonomy.
the falcatum looks more like macranthum (an even better slower plant)
verticillatum from the Himalaya's with pale pink flowers will have its old name back at some point as it is not verticillatum from Europe
verticillatum from Europe has always been slow for me and usually gets just over a foot without flowers.

Aaron,I am sorry for my bad taxonomy! But my priority is mostly that i like the plants and then there is the will of correct taxonomy.
I am really irritated why so many plants that are on market are misnamed. I honor your plantknowledge as i do honor Marks plant knowledge. Thanks to you all for opening my eyes :-)
And Aaron i will post some other Polygonatum and you are welcome to correct my taxonomy.
What is my P.vert.'Himalayan Giant' ?

Afloden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-15

The Himalayan "verticillatum" are a mix of taxa. Sometimes I see cirrhifolium, but most are the verticillatum rubrum type thing which has been called sibiricum as well. The correct name for the rubrum type plant (which in itself is an awful name for the pale pink flowers) is still to be determined, but there are 3 choices from the 1800's that are far better suited than verticillatum. 

I wish more people in the nursery trade cared about the name of their plants, but aesthetics are primary in the business and taxonomy secondary. I happen to like both.

Always interested in seeing additional pictures. It is nice to see how they grow in other places. I kill hookeri in my climate and roseum has never flowered, but still lives!

Your macranthum is an outstanding plant. Mine has 1 stem after 3 years and the other clone has none this year :-( Maybe the rhizome is still there?

Aaron

ErnieC123
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-02

Thank you Aaron! And i divided of a big piece of the P.macranthum for a friend. It grows and grows.
I like the pictures you made on srgc! Some lovely ones!!!
I like the P.falcatum 'Silverstripe', P.cyrtonema 'Purpleleaf', kingianum tall form (what gorgeous flowers!), but i don't have those pretty ones.
Aaron, have you heard of P.lasianthum 'Purpureum' ??? I felt in love with a picture i found from that cultivar.
I will put all of them on my wishlist, but i think it will not be easy to get them:-(

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

My P. verticillatum(?) only gets to be about two feet, but I know Trond's grows much larger - something like double the height, I think(?) ???

Depends on the soil and moisture. They love moist soil. But they flower every year  ;)

McDonough wrote:

What's the horizontal rate of spread?

The rate of spread isn't very quick (10cm/year or so) but steady. In some years it fill all available space.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

My Polygonatums and Maianthemums as well haven't leafed out yet. The progress is slow with the cold nights we still have. We ought to have a Maianthemum thread too!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Afloden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-15

Polygonatum lasianthum purpureum that I have seen (Northern Lights and another cultivar) are actually P. amabile from Japan. What distinguishes it are the perianth and filaments, leaves undulate, and the pale mid-rib of the leaf.

I am not sure if I have true kingianum. The red form will get another name, or rather, like so many, its old name back. Falcatum -silver stripe is easy, but so slow to get started. After 10 years I finally have a half dozen stems (and a pot of one year old seedlings crossed with a wild collected falcatum).

Aaron

ErnieC123
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-02

Afloden wrote:

Polygonatum lasianthum purpureum that I have seen (Northern Lights and another cultivar) are actually P. amabile from Japan. What distinguishes it are the perianth and filaments, leaves undulate, and the pale mid-rib of the leaf.

I am not sure if I have true kingianum. The red form will get another name, or rather, like so many, its old name back. Falcatum -silver stripe is easy, but so slow to get started. After 10 years I finally have a half dozen stems (and a pot of one year old seedlings crossed with a wild collected falcatum).

Aaron

Thanks a lot

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Our garden has always seemed too dry for many of these later growing woodlanders but we do have a small plant of Polygonatum x hybridum 'Betberg' with its extraordinary dark leaves. I hope it will begin to increase!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

ErnieC123
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-02

Tim, i like 'Betberg' too, but it's getting more green now, so a little of its flair walks away. Do you know how fast 'Betberg' spreads?
I bought my plant a few weeks ago with two stems. I have great expectations for that cultivar.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Tim, Polygonatum x hybridum 'Betberg'  is wonderful!  I imagine a mature multi-stemmed clump would make a bold impression in the garden.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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