Bloodroot - Sanguinaria canadensis

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Aaron... wow, you more than met my expectations to show varying forms of bloodroot here, great diversity! :o  The cut-leaf form is so delicate, it's a real beauty, worthy of being named in my opinion. The dwarf form is another "must introduce"; I've seen forms of bloodroot grown in situations so much to their liking that the foliage grew as big as cabbages.  A refined dwarf form would surely become an essential rock garden entry.

The one dubbed "doublecross" illustrates a point cited in Flora of North America where they state "In some plants the petals are clearly differentiated into sets of two different sizes, but in others the differentiation is barely perceptible".  Looks like a fine find :D.  And again, in my opinion it is worthy of introduction, the name "Doublecross" is good.  When one sees all of the wonderful varying forms of Japanese plants being selected and named by avid Japanese gardeners (such as shown in the Syneilesis topic and certainly as with Hepatica), I am reminded about the unfortunate general disregard for native flora in North America, whereby innumerable wonderful variations worthy of selection and introduction mostly remain unnoticed and anonymous. So, the work that you do to illustrate and grow such variant forms is of such value.

The photo of the Tennessee form perfectly answers Lis' question about what's different about the Tennessee form, extra petals it is!

Aaron, when you find more of your Sanguinaria images, we will certainly love to see them.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Allison
Allison's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-04-08

cohan wrote:

Lovely plants, though I prefer the singles, or maybe semi-doubles :) Pink would be cool!

I haven't got any yet, will have to watch for seed, I guess Kristl should have it.. I've noticed Richter's H erbs(Ontario) sells plants, not a bad price ...  Or, if you have more to spend, you can buy a bucketload of rootlets!

Those rootlets are dried! Wouldn't grow too well.

I can send you lots of seeds of the 16-petal form if you like, Cohan. They are ephemeral so I would put them in a baggie with some damp vermiculite and since you are in Canada like me I could easily then mail them to you. Send me an email off list with your address if you'd like some. They are ripe pretty soon after the flowers fade, maybe end of May this year. The seeds germinate easily - just pop them in a pot, keep it slightly damp all summer and leave it out over winter and in the spring you'll have a good crop. They'll bloom the next summer.

Gardening on a wooded rocky ridge in the Ottawa Valley, Canada. Cold winters (-30C) and hot, humid summers. Nuts about native plants, ferns, pottery, my family, and Border Collies.

Allison
Allison's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-04-08

Wonderful photos! I had no idea there were so many variations. And I didn't recognize the Tennessee form as unusual because that is the type I have in my garden! OK, so I inspected some plants growing wild around the property and I found I also have the plainer 8-petal form. I also have one 16-petal pinkish one. It blooms a few days later (but that might be because it is in a shadier spot) and so far has never set seed. It's not quite as pink as the one in the photos, but nice anyway.

Thanks for the links - I enjoyed looking at those!

Gardening on a wooded rocky ridge in the Ottawa Valley, Canada. Cold winters (-30C) and hot, humid summers. Nuts about native plants, ferns, pottery, my family, and Border Collies.

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Lis wrote:

cohan wrote:

Lovely plants, though I prefer the singles, or maybe semi-doubles :) Pink would be cool!

I haven't got any yet, will have to watch for seed, I guess Kristl should have it.. I've noticed Richter's H erbs(Ontario) sells plants, not a bad price ...  Or, if you have more to spend, you can buy a bucketload of rootlets!

Those rootlets are dried! Wouldn't grow too well.

I can send you lots of seeds of the 16-petal form if you like, Cohan. They are ephemeral so I would put them in a baggie with some damp vermiculite and since you are in Canada like me I could easily then mail them to you. Send me an email off list with your address if you'd like some. They are ripe pretty soon after the flowers fade, maybe end of May this year. The seeds germinate easily - just pop them in a pot, keep it slightly damp all summer and leave it out over winter and in the spring you'll have a good crop. They'll bloom the next summer.

OH! The rootlets they are selling for direct herbal use, not growing? I never caught that!! I know they sell dried herbs of many plants, but those they sell rootlets of, I just assumed it was propagation material...
I'd be happy for seed of any forms (except the flore pleno type, they just don't seem to belong in the woodland, maybe in some more formal kind of bed....though clearly, that's just me  ;D )

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

With once again unseasonably warm weather (80 F today, then for Boston Marathon day tomorrow predicted high is 90 F or 32 C) flowers are popping open speadily.  With my clump of Sanguinaria canadensis 'Multiplex', the flowers are wide open and beautiful.  From an overhead view you can see on the left some shoots that are coming up later and with smaller flowers.  Not sure if it represents a different clone or just younger rhizomes.

The flowers of the smaller, later-sprouting ones, actually show a pink tinge on the inside, not just the outside, but not perceptible in the photo.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

kalle-k.dk
kalle-k.dk's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-05

Beautiful plants and a great selections Aaron.

I grow four sanguineum; species canadensis and tree cultivars 'Roseum' - 'Star' and 'Multiplex' and they grow well in a woodland area here in Denmark.

Karl Kristensen
Denmark.
www.kalle-k.dk

dirtgently
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-15

kalle-k.dk wrote:

I grow four sanguineum; species canadensis and tree cultivars 'Roseum' - 'Star' and 'Multiplex' and they grow well in a woodland area here in Denmark.

I've never seen the Roseum form before. I'd be grateful for any pictures.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hello dirtgently, welcome to the NARGS Forum.  There is a small gallery with some excellent photos of the pink form of bloodroot at John Lonsdale's Edgewood Gardens website:
http://www.edgewoodgardens.net/Plants_album/The%20Plants%20-%20%20Complete%20Collection/Papaveraceae/Sanguinaria/index4.html

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Those really look as though they hold their pink colour well after opening. The form I have grown has quite strong pink buds but opens almost pure white. I had no idea there was so much variation in this plant - fascinating to see.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Zonedenial
Zonedenial's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-11

When they are just opening, I don't think there is a more elegant flower in the garden than S. canadensis multiplex:

Don Bolin  Zone 5a in eastern Iowa, USA (corn country).

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