Seed starting chronicles 2012

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Fermi wrote:

This Ebenus creticus was sown a few weeks ago and germinated yesterday - I hadn't been hopeful as mice had gotten into the packet and I didn't know if anything viable (edible!) was left to sow! Seeing Lori's Ebenus psidica made me think I should post this pic!
cheers
fermi

Fermi, I've always been curious about your seed sowing technique where it looks like the gravel mulch is "domed" and filled right to the brim of the pots; is this done for drainage purposes?  From what I've seen, you get good germination.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Like Mark said, I don't recognize half the seeds you are growing Lori....I assume these are mostly Halda or Holubec seed? (In which case, most would not be suitabe for Newfoundland as we are too wet).

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

BTW, I would have thought many of those genera needed a strat period..yet you didn't.  How do you know which to do and which not to do? (I follow the ORGS site but many of the more unusual seeds are not listed there)

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Thanks for the info about Syncalathium/Melanoseris, Mark - I'll add that to my records.

The very unfamiliar things I'm growing are mainly from this year's (and past) orders from Mojmir Pavelka and Vojtech Holubec, collected in Turkey, China, Macedonia and Greece, Kazakhstan, and Russia.  (I'll go back into that posting and add some more detail about the species, provenance, etc..)

So far as deciding whether they'd need stratification or not, well, I make some wild guesses!  
I made the assumption that Brassicaceae and Asteraceae may be less inclined to need stratification than some others.   What does everyone think about that?
If they don't germinate after, say 3-4 weeks, I put them in the cold room for some chilling, and pull them out again in 6 weeks or so for another try.

I scarify all Fabaceae, and then try them at room temp, which usually works.  (I think that's pretty standard... ?)

Other than that, I rely a lot on an article by Alan Bradshaw (Alplains) about seed starting that was published in the CRAGS newsletter, which gives some useful guidelines for which genera generally need stratification and which don't... and I refer to Dr. Deno's texts, although many of the more exotic genera aren't covered there.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori, Syncalathium souliei looks very exiting! Hope you manage to grow it.

Firstly I set my seedpots in a temperate room and then bring them to a colder place if they don't sprout in  two - three weeks. Some montane species like Cremanthodium sprouts immediately in 10-15C other prefere higher temperature.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

I agree that Syncalathium souliei looks like a keeper!

Lori, are you growing Inula rhizocephala?  I have seeds from two sources and neither germinated...maybe THEY need stratification?

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Looking back at my notes, I grew Inula rhizocephala in 2009 at room temperature and had germination... enough to result in several plants to set out.  I didn't note how long it took to germinate.  So, perhaps it might have done better with stratification, I don't know.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Good show Lori and Fermi :)
I looked at the Syncalathium when looking over Holubec's offerings- I'm more and more enamored of many Asteraceae, but some of these Himalayan oddities are especially exciting...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

I am germinating in a cool greenhouse....only 13 C on a cloudy day (most days!) but to 20 C on a sunny.  Maybe they (Inula) just need a longer time.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Re. eFlora of China's treatment of Syncalathium souliei as Melanoseris souliei:
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=132065

The Plant List doesn't seem to agree; it shows Syncalathium souliei as a recognized species, but not Melanoseris souliei... but who knows how well Chinese alpines are integrated into this list?
http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl/record/gcc-34700
http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl/search?q=Melanoseris+souliei

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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